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Author: Subject: Pretty Pictures (2)
DraconicAcid
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[*] posted on 17-4-2015 at 08:04


Quote: Originally posted by Bezaleel  

Interesting to see that this is a purple compound, as cyanuric acid and copper(II) also combine to form a purple compound. So, the purple colour may well arise from the N-Cu bond, when N is also bonded to C.


Not surprising, actually- most amine-type copper(II) complexes are purple or blue-purple, [Cu(NH3)4]2+ being the prime example. The copper cyanide, however is a bit more surprising, as cyanide is a very strong-field ligand, and you'd expect a different colour.




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The Volatile Chemist
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[*] posted on 17-4-2015 at 12:57


Quote: Originally posted by blargish  
Not the best quality pic in the world, but a cool effect seen when dark-brown crystals of potassium tetraperoxochromate(V) are put into hydrochloric acid, with the formation of a blue chromium oxide diperoxide complex: CrO(O2)2.



Is the second complex isolate-able? Nice picture! SuperVillan, nice picture too!




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mayko
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[*] posted on 20-4-2015 at 19:06




Here's a couple I made with pictures taken via scanning electron microscopy, and colorized using GIMP and public-domain images from Wikimedia Commons. I entered an art contest with them at the university I work at ... didn't win, but they're decorating one of the chemistry buildings!





Third_Eye.jpeg - 2.3MB

"Dorsal Ocelli"
Insects are famous for their compound eyes; who hasn’t seen a microphotograph of the honeycombed lenses of an ant’s eye? Less well known is the fact that many insects also have simple eyes on the tops of their heads. Pictured here are the simple eyes of a fruit fly. What do they see? Light? Motion? Shape? What would it be like for humans to have two distinct forms of sight?







lovecraftian_horror_fly.jpeg - 2MB

“Are Lovecraftian Horrors Circling Your Bananas?”
Humans seem to have a kind of common sense, an intuition about how the world aroundthem looks and works. But because it's been built around what is common in human experience, it can lead to counterintuitive results on small spatial scales (quantum mechanics) or at very high velocities (relativity). Here's a less extreme example: this is the mouth of a fruit fly. Is this what you'd naturally associate with your household insect friends?




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The Volatile Chemist
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[*] posted on 21-4-2015 at 12:15


Nice! What method did you use to colorize them?



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Volanschemia
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[*] posted on 23-4-2015 at 18:01


Some pictures of the slow precipitation of Lead(II) Iodide by heating the solution to 95C so all the compound dissolves and slowly cooling down again.

Pictures of dry crystals in vial soon to follow.

IMGP1224.jpg - 269kBIMGP1253.jpg - 276kBIMGP1260.jpg - 264kB




"The chemists are a strange class of mortals, impelled by an almost insane impulse to seek their pleasures amid smoke and vapor, soot and flame, poisons and poverty; yet among all these evils I seem to live so sweetly that may I die if I were to change places with the Persian king" - Johann Joachim Becher, 1635 to 1682.
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blargish
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[*] posted on 23-4-2015 at 18:17


Quote: Originally posted by TheAustralianScientist  
Some pictures of the slow precipitation of Lead(II) Iodide by heating the solution to 95C so all the compound dissolves and slowly cooling down again.

Pictures of dry crystals in vial soon to follow.


Just got some lead(II) nitrate and can't wait to try this reaction out! It looks awesome!




BLaRgISH
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Volanschemia
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[*] posted on 23-4-2015 at 18:33


Yes, it is a beautiful process to watch.
It looks like there is so much product there, but when dry all that barely fills up a 4mL vial.

I also love how the yellow precipitate dissolves to give a colourless solution.

[Edit] Typo.

[Edited on 24-4-2015 by TheAustralianScientist]

[Edited on 24-4-2015 by TheAustralianScientist]




"The chemists are a strange class of mortals, impelled by an almost insane impulse to seek their pleasures amid smoke and vapor, soot and flame, poisons and poverty; yet among all these evils I seem to live so sweetly that may I die if I were to change places with the Persian king" - Johann Joachim Becher, 1635 to 1682.
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[*] posted on 23-4-2015 at 18:44


Quote: Originally posted by The Volatile Chemist  
Nice! What method did you use to colorize them?


Part of it was using the Color Balance and Colorize tools. For the first, I used the clone tool to copy image info from other pictures (eg, a CD which had been microwaved, a butterly's wing under the microscope). I used the "color" setting, meaning that the patterns of saturation and value are preserved, but the color is carried over. For the second, I made a transparent layer over the main image which had the edges brought out and then motion blurred and colorized.




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[*] posted on 29-4-2015 at 06:31
My crystals




xebmMl7l71w.jpg - 24kBrD6vlxFHAoA.jpg - 25kBjPV05FT_BrY.jpg - 45kBTA-_UnXCjcg.jpg - 26kB8dJ1-GzUVBU.jpg - 30kBVAWopvhtwz4.jpg - 38kBVM9CFYu6Wio.jpg - 34kB
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[*] posted on 29-4-2015 at 07:58


Beautiful pictures, need details!
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[*] posted on 29-4-2015 at 08:33
My crystals 2




eKC_RzxxKwo.jpg - 34kBgUXGVqmZHRQ.jpg - 32kBt_SUjVLOHBk.jpg - 27kB5cbXOPMs0vY.jpg - 27kBmr1MkQrq1mA.jpg - 30kB
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BobD1001
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[*] posted on 29-4-2015 at 20:02


Gleb, truly beautiful crystal specimens!
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[*] posted on 30-4-2015 at 05:58


Small (0.5cm) crystals of Neodymium sulphate.

Neodymium sulphate.jpg - 232kB




If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.
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[*] posted on 30-4-2015 at 06:47


Gleb, those are beautiful. What's your secret?

Also Nezza, that is awesome! I've never seen neodymium salts before.
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[*] posted on 30-4-2015 at 07:03


There's several in "The Trouble with Neodymium..." thread! The ones I've produced all share the characteristic that they have different colors under different lighting (sunlight, CFL, etc.). Very cool!

Nezza, those are fantastic crystals. How big are they?
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[*] posted on 30-4-2015 at 08:05


Indeed, Gleb, how'd you grow those? They appear to not have been suspended by string...?



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[*] posted on 30-4-2015 at 08:09


Gleb, you can't leave us hanging like this! At least tell us what compound the crystals are made of!



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[*] posted on 30-4-2015 at 23:02


1 and 2 double copper-calcium acetate CaCu(CH3COO)4*2H2O
3 yellow blood salt K4[Fe(CN)6]*3H2O
4 nickel sulfate NiSO4*6H2O
5 red blood salt K3[Fe(CN)6]*3H2O
6 potassium dichromate K2Cr2O7
7 iron sulfate Fe(SO4)*7H2O
8 nickel sulfate NiSO4*7H2O (7H2O not 6H2O)
9 Rochelle salt KNaC4H4O6*4H2O
10 copper acetate Cu(CH3COO)2
11 potassium chromate K2CrO4
12 magnesium sulfate MgSO4*7H2O
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[*] posted on 1-5-2015 at 08:12


Quote: Originally posted by Amos  
Gleb, you can't leave us hanging like this! At least tell us what compound the crystals are made of!

But Amos, from the looks of it, they weren't hanging... ;)




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Detonationology
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[*] posted on 6-5-2015 at 07:45


Here is some Bismuth metal I extracted from Pepto Bismol, mixed with a bit of methanol

Bismuth Flame 1.png - 68kB Bismuth Flame 2.png - 87kB Bismuth Flame 3.png - 56kB Bismuth Flame 4.png - 68kB
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[*] posted on 6-5-2015 at 08:05


This is the best thread on the site. Perhaps my favorite on the web.

You guys really know how to rock!




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[*] posted on 6-5-2015 at 08:56


Quote: Originally posted by Detonationology  
Here is some Bismuth metal I extracted from Pepto Bismol, mixed with a bit of methanol



How did you reduce the bismuth subsalicylate? Hydrochloric acid and aluminum, perhaps? I have read of people attempting to reduce it with carbon, but reported poor results.
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[*] posted on 6-5-2015 at 09:04


Quote: Originally posted by Loptr  
Quote: Originally posted by Detonationology  
Here is some Bismuth metal I extracted from Pepto Bismol, mixed with a bit of methanol



How did you reduce the bismuth subsalicylate? Hydrochloric acid and aluminum, perhaps? I have read of people attempting to reduce it with carbon, but reported poor results.


That is exactly what I did. I then used some methanol to rinse the salicylic acid out
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[*] posted on 6-5-2015 at 12:38


I've tried that one and it yields Bi powder, which isn't very interesting to me so I tried melting it down to an ingot. That failed, and instead it oxidized to yellow bismuth trioxide! Too finely powdered, I guess.
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[*] posted on 10-5-2015 at 00:50
Photoluminophor


Combining photoluminophor, epoxy glue and bottles of brandy.

Yy6oUF1jn08.jpg - 17kBeTq7W4pOej8.jpg - 16kBaAZMLSWH54M.jpg - 19kB
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