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jewels
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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 09:43
mole ratio


I know the mole ratio is 1 to 4
Fe2 S3 to O2
How do I get 1 to 4
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David Marx
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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 10:00


Could you clarify your post please?

It doesn't seem to make any sense. What is 1:4? How do you know this? Is there a reaction you have balanced?




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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 10:07


Hi, I took a test and the question was:
In the balanced reaction shown, the mole ratio of Fe2 S3 to O2..... is Fe2 O3+ 4O2= 2FeO +3SO2...the answer was 1 to 4????
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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 10:07


Homework question...AGAIN

Zero input from your side....AGAIN

Cryptic post....AGAIN

You know what this means...improve or see your thread being closed...AGAIN




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David Marx
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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 10:42


Maybe I'm not following along here but in your rxn, you don't have Fe2S3 anywhere. Now you could figure out the needed ratio of reactants based on the supplied products. This is just stoichometry. You go about balancing all the Fe then all the O or however your particular text goes about it.

Where are these questions coming from, just out of curiosity? Who offers this online course?




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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 10:58


Hi again..I am taking a online course in Atlanta..its at a 2 year Associate Degree college. My online teacher likes to give questions that are not covered in the online material. I am not doing so well in this class and I am ready to quit..but I paid over 400.00 bucks for my class and books. I am trying to get my associate degree in dental hygiene. I know I will never use chemistry..makes me wonder why I have to take it..Thanks for you help anyway..
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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 11:48


If you don't even like chemistry what are you doing here? Why don't you buy some better books and study them in your spare time.
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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 12:05


Quote:

I am trying to get my associate degree in dental hygiene. I know I will never use chemistry


You'll never use chemistry eh? Desinfectants? What about alloys and "cements" for teeth reconstruction? Anesthetics maybe? Nasty side reactions between the stuff you use on your patient?

If I'd be religious, I'd be praying for your patients. And you. Because you're asking for lawsuits from angry patients this way...




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[*] posted on 1-11-2004 at 15:12


Fe2S3 +4O2 --> 2FeO +3SO2
Here is your 1:4 ratio

Next time do some work and show us that you have actually thought about this problem in a way other than "I have no idea wtf I am doing"
:mad:

I fear for your patients lives...
A scenario if you will...;)
Dentist: Ok____(jewels) give that patient the nitrous oxide now
Jewels: Ok *picks up tank of NO2 and lets the patient start inhaling it*
Patient: MY LUNGS!!!!!!
Dentist: Oh **** this is going to cause a lawsuit... Jewels, You're fired

See with a bit of chemical knowledge you would still have your hypothetical job AND the patient would still be alive.




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[*] posted on 2-11-2004 at 00:43


You seem to have missed one of the most basic principles of education. Just because a particular question may be of no use, doesn't mean that the fundamental concepts it teaches you aren't important. Yes, you are unlikely to work with ferric sulphide. However, you will certainly be expected to understand molarity.

The questions you ask are so basic, that any moderately intelligent person (who is willing to put in a modicum of effort) could master the underlying concepts. If you really can't do this work, what makes you think you're suited for a medical profession?




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[*] posted on 2-11-2004 at 12:38


Quote:
Originally posted by jewels
..Thanks for you help anyway..


C'mon guys...Weren't you listening? He's Entitled to your help dont'cha know...

You guys should be grateful that he's gracing you with even bits and bytes of his homework question...

:cool:




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thalium
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[*] posted on 2-11-2004 at 12:47


1.How old are you to ask this? I know this shit from when I was 14 years old
2.Online courses S**K




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[*] posted on 2-11-2004 at 13:01


I'm so glad everyone has given their input into my question..(by the way no one has answered it) but nevermind I figured it out.. someone asked me how old I was? Are you people all in highschool? I'm also not a guy..I messed up when I was young and dropped out of highschool at 16. I got my GED went on to be a hairdresser. I have made a pretty good living for myself for the past 13 years. I thought I would go back to school and try something else. I never even took chemistry in highschool before I quit. This is all new to me. It is very hard to have a family, work and go to school all at the same time. All I was asking for was a little help. I don't know why I get all these rude comments!!!!!
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[*] posted on 2-11-2004 at 17:46


Ah Jewels, I guess you get a wide spectrum of replies simply because your initial questions appear badly phrased, with minimal input of your own, which appears kind of demanding.
But anyway, if you look at the above posts, Rogue_chemist answered your question, so all is good :).

Anyway - as it's been said - it's kind of silly to solve/help with problems if not even the most fundamental basics are established.
It's like asking to solve a mathematical function for you while not understanding the principles of multiplication! Anyone would then tell you too to first read up & LEARN, before you ask. Don't you think that makes sense?

So, why don't you go to the library and ask for a book such as 'chemistry for beginners'? Read one or two chapters, should take you no more than an evening or two, and you will suddenly be enlightened by your understanding of chemistry!


PS Oh, and yes, you may not need it in the future, but where is the harm in learning something that may not have some immediate use?




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[*] posted on 2-11-2004 at 20:20


You people are certainly being mean to jewels. I might as well join in.

Jewels the reason you dropped out of high school orginally was probably because you didn't see any point in learning all that rubbish. Then you found out that being a hairdresser for the rest of your life would probably toast your liver due to all the toxic chemicals used to treat hair (that darn chemistry again). So onto something more sophisticated like the medical field.

I suggest that you learn a lesson from your high school experience (where you could have earned an excellent introduction to chemistry for free) and develop a new attitude toward learning somethings that you don't see an immediate application for. You might even learn to like this! If you learn to love learning the grades and the degrees will just come automatically when you aren't even looking. ;) Give it a try!




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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 06:24


so...what you ask is that as many moles enter a reaction the same number of them result. In your case you have 1+4 and 2+3 and 1+4=2+3 => 5=5. So you actualy asked the mole ratio between reactants



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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 06:26


btw learn to ask questions... not all ppl are blonde... and also I'm a she too



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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 09:23


Quote:
Originally posted by thalium
so...what you ask is that as many moles enter a reaction the same number of them result. In your case you have 1+4 and 2+3 and 1+4=2+3 => 5=5. So you actualy asked the mole ratio between reactants


What? This is nonsense. There is no Law of Conservation of Stoichometric Coefficients! You are working with a concept error. Consider:

2 H2 + O2 --> 2 H2O

2+1 = 2???

[Edited on 3-11-2004 by David Marx]




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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 10:58


actually I was drunk when I wrote this (party aftermath) and I said it for this thing you're right there isn't any conservation of stoichiometric coefficients... I tried to say that she probably asked about mole ratio between reactants. However there is a conservation of mass law that says that the total mass of the reactants equals the total mass of the products. There also is a law that says " when the same mass of an element combines with different masses of a second element to form different compounds, between the masses of the second element there is a ratio of small and integer numbers(for example in water you have 2/16 that equals 1/8 and in H2O2 you have 2/32 that equals 1/16) . Btw there also is the constant volumes law... sorry for writing when drunk:)



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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 14:26


Quote:
Originally posted by thalium
when the same mass of an element combines with different masses of a second element to form different compounds, between the masses of the second element there is a ratio of small and integer numbers(for example in water you have 2/16 that equals 1/8 and in H2O2 you have 2/32 that equals 1/16)


Could you clarify this? It makes no sense whatsoever.
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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 15:14


He's referring to the law of multiple proportions I believe. If you take 2 compounds (1 & 2) of the same elements (a and b), then the percentage by mass of A over the amount of B related by a small whole-number ratio to the same figure from the second compound. I know that's horribly badly stated.... I'm going to post an example that I just wrote up for a course I'm taking.

2 iron oxide have different percentages of iron and oxygen. A has 69.9% iron, 30.0% oxygen. B has 77.7%iron and 22.3% oxygen

69.9 / 30.0 = 2.33
77.7 / 22.3 = 3.4843 -> 3.48

2.33 / 3.48 = 0.669= ~ 2/3 (some degree of error – introduced by rounding)

Hopefully that clears it up, or am I way off?

edit: spelling.

[Edited on 3-11-2004 by Oxydro]
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[*] posted on 3-11-2004 at 23:15


See what happens when you learn only from online courses?:P



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