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Author: Subject: My iron salts collection
Toluene
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smile.gif posted on 11-1-2014 at 16:06
My iron salts collection


Hi everyone!, in this photo I show you my Iron salts collection

I know that it's still small, but I'm planning to do some Iron nitrate, mohr's salt and iron acetate, I'd like to do also citrate and a ferrate salt such as sodium ferrate, but I don't know if it is going to be stable in solid form, and for the case of citrate I don't know nothing about its production

Any recommendations for making the family bigger? :D:D



The last one, is this pink- brownish compound, synthethised this evening wich is Iron III aspirinate




Cheers!


[Edited on 12-1-2014 by Toluene]

[Edited on 13-1-2014 by ScienceSquirrel]
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alexleyenda
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 16:14


Looks great :D Challenge (I guess) suggestion : Iron Bromide (make it yourself :p )
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 16:16


Thank you alexleyenda!;) unfortunately I don't have acces to any bromide or any source of bromine in order to prepare hydrobromic acid :(

btw, al the salts have been prepared by me from iron metal (steel wool)
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 16:28


Iron citrate might be easily attacked by moulds as many other citrate salts

Iron ammonium citrate is photosensitive and you can make some blueprints or whatever those photographic papers are called
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Toluene
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 16:33


Thanks Radom, is then any way to synthesis the citrate or the iron ammonium citrate?
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 16:35


Quote: Originally posted by Toluene  
Thank you alexleyenda!;) unfortunately I don't have acces to any bromide or any source of bromine in order to prepare hydrobromic acid :(


That was what I thought, that's why it's a challenge :p by the way, a source is not so hard to find, it took me 10 seconds on the website of a local pool store http://www.clubpiscine.ca/417-product-spas-hot-tubs-maintena...

[Edited on 12-1-2014 by alexleyenda]
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 17:06


Toluene have you ever heard of oil of iron?it is not a salt but it is a sweet smelling oily stuff made with iron sulfate or pyrite,(nitric acid?)and acetone i believe.i used to could google it and it would come up but lately i cant get nothing.potassiumferrocyanide would be good salt for you and the prettiest ferrycyanide.iron sulfate and aspirinate are so gentle looking it's almost therapeutic and to think these salts come from cold mean rugged steel.mean?so i guess iron salicylate is the word for it?

[Edited on 1-12-2014 by cyanureeves]
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 17:39


Quote: Originally posted by Toluene  
Thanks Radom, is then any way to synthesis the citrate or the iron ammonium citrate?


Mix iron hydroxide with citric acid and then add ammonia. Then again add citric acid until no precipitate is seen with ammonia.

There are several forms depending on reagent ratios. Remember it can catch mould easily, maybe there is something that can be added to prevent it?
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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 18:59


Nice collection, some other possible additions would be Iron thiocyanate and Iron oxalate.

[Edited on 12-1-2014 by Pinkhippo11]




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[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 20:13


Try ferric sulfate, ferrous chloride, ferrous oxide, magnetite, or ferrous iodide. Ferric alums would be interesting. Some nice, unusual ones could include iron chromates, molybdates, tungstates, tantalates, niobates, and vanadates.
And what about something like ferrous or ferric ferrate? That would be really interesting.




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[*] posted on 12-1-2014 at 02:02


Suggestion: ferric alum. Several preparations have been described on this forum.



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[*] posted on 12-1-2014 at 03:04


Thank you all for your advices! I will update this thread when I prepare more salts! :D:D Thank you!!
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[*] posted on 12-1-2014 at 06:59


You can also try to make ferrofluid.
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[*] posted on 12-1-2014 at 20:18


Ferrous oxalate would be an interesting one as its thermal decomposition leaves pyrophoric iron particles
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[*] posted on 12-1-2014 at 20:36


Potassium iron(III) oxalate forms nice green crystals.



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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 02:59


This is a nice initiative and I like to see this kind of collections. I, however, have one remark about the storage of the compounds. You should not use corked bottles, but bottles with a decent screw cap, which is not made of metal. E.g. FeCl3.6H2O and Fe(NO3)3.9H2O are quite corrosive and very hygroscopic and these certainly interact with the cork in undesirable ways. FeSO4.7H2O is very prone to aerial oxidation and I'm quite sure that after a few years of storage your ferrous sulfate is not looking nice mintgreen, but dirty green with brown spots in it.

Cork simply is not a suitable way of stoppering chemicals. It was used in the past, due to lack of better materials, but nowadays you should not use it anymore for anything which is more permanent than for a few days.




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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 06:04


Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Potassium iron(III) oxalate forms nice green crystals.


http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=20688




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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 06:09


Hi everyone! This evening I'm going to synthesis iron ammonium citrate, I will bring up with the results!

Thanks for your advice woelen, but the stop-corked vials are more classic and more elegant :cool: , nah seriously, I don't have the acces to other vials by the moment, maybe in a few weeks I can buy, so I'll transfer them :)
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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 06:24


By the way, a friend of mine who's a chemist helped me with the structure of the iron aspirinate

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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 10:12


It is also interesting to make transient iron species. You cannot store them, but their formation and subsequent destruction is interesting to watch. One nice example is addition of an iron(III) salt to a solution of sodium thiosulfate. This gives a beautiful purple solution, due to formation of a thiocyanato complex of iron(III). This complex, however, is unstable, an internal redox reaction occurs, with the iron going to oxidation state +2 and the thiosulfate being oxidized to tetrathionate.

A nice crystalline compound is potassium trisoxalatoferrate(III). You can make this by dissolving an iron(III) salt in a solution of oxalic acid and potassium carbonate (or hydroxide). This complex forms nice green crystals, more like grass and not like the pale green iron(II) sulfate. K3Fe(C2O4)3 is sparingly soluble in cold water and can easily be recrystallized. You could also try to make the ammonium salt of this, which also can be crystallized easily.

EDIT: I now see that DraconicAcid mentioned this chemical already before I did.

[Edited on 13-1-14 by woelen]




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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 15:01


Hi! I tried to prepare this evening ammonium ferric citrate, I disolved 10g of Fe(OH)3 in 50 mL of saturated solution of citric acid, then I added 50 mL of household ammonia, nothing seemed to precipitate, a brown solution is all i got, I didn't want to boil of the water, because I thought that an excess of temperature may yield Fe2O3, so I have the solution evaporating and I don't know If I've done it right
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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 18:44


Color and properties of this product are highly dependant on the ratios of reactants. Also there might be some purification needed as there might also be ammonium citrate etc.. It's not so simple but you may try some experiments with it, especially you have ferrocyanide. You can search for blueprint experiments or also research ratios of reactants.
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[*] posted on 13-1-2014 at 18:45


How about, Iron oxide (FeO), Iron persulphide FeS2, Iron nitrate hexahydrate: Fe(NO3)2.6H2O, Iron iodide tetrahydrate: FeI2.4H2O, Diiron trisulphate nonahydrate: Fe2(SO4)3.9H2O.

[Edited on 14-1-2014 by Zyklonb]




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[*] posted on 14-1-2014 at 15:02


Go for Iron benzoate, iron ammonium phosphate (which is said to be blue but the green variant most common)
Quote: Originally posted by Random  
Iron citrate might be easily attacked by moulds as many other citrate salts


Yeah its hard to remove the last 2 water molecules out of the citrate which makes it very fluffy for bateria to eat through.

Quote: Originally posted by Random  

Iron ammonium citrate is photosensitive and you can make some blueprints or whatever those photographic papers are called


Genius! genius!
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[*] posted on 15-1-2014 at 04:55


Besides the interesting pyrophoric-iron experiment iron oxalate can be used to make holograms (preferably with blue laser).

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