Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Red phosphorus stabilized end encapsuled
otonel
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 83
Registered: 9-4-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-1-2014 at 07:37
Red phosphorus stabilized end encapsuled


I open this topic because I don`t find any information about this and what I have is some US patents about this process used to make red phosphorus more stable in time for used in some priming compound.
I want to stabilize and encapsulating RP but my big problem is encapsulating because I don`t have experience in apply a polymer layer in aqueous solution .
I post a piece of text about what I want to do from a European patent EP 1 829 849 A1

Quote:



The red phosphorus may be stabilized by coating particles of the red phosphorus with a metal oxide, such as
a metal hydroxide. The metal oxide may be precipitated on a surface of the red phosphorus particles. The metal oxide
coating functions as a stabilizer to buffer traces of acids that form upon oxidation of the red phosphorus. The metal oxide
may be aluminum hydroxide, bismuth hydroxide, cadmium hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, chromium hydroxide, germanium
hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, manganese hydroxide, niobium hydroxide, silicon hydroxide, tin hydroxide, titanium
hydroxide, zinc hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, or mixtures thereof. The metal oxide may be present in the stabilized,
encapsulated red phosphorus in a total quantity that ranges from approximately 0.1 wt% to approximately 2 wt% based
on the quantity of red phosphorus.
?[0017] Once stabilized, the particles of the red phosphorus may be encapsulated by coating the particles with a
polymer, such as a thermoset resin. Encapsulating the stabilized, red phosphorus particles reduces their active surface
and provides the stabilized, red phosphorus particles with water repellancy and acid resistance. Examples of polymers
that may be used to encapsulate the stabilized, red phosphorus particles include, but are not limited to, an epoxy resin,
melamine resin, phenol formaldehyde resin,? polyurethane resin, or mixtures thereof. The polymer may be present in the
stabilized, encapsulated red phosphorus in a total quantity that ranges from approximately 1 wt% to approximately 5
wt% based on the quantity of red phosphorus. The metal oxide and the polymer may be present in a total quantity of
from approximately 1.1 % wt% to approximately 8 wt% based on the quantity of red phosphorus.
?[0018] The red phosphorus particles may be coated with the metal oxide by mixing an aqueous suspension of the red
phosphorus particles with a water-?soluble metal salt. The pH of the aqueous suspension may be adjusted, precipitating
the metal oxide on the red phosphorus particles. An aqueous solution of a preliminary condensation product of the
polymer may be prepared and added, with mixing, to the coated red phosphorus particles. The solution and the coated
red phosphorus particles may be reacted for a period of time that ranges from approximately 0.5 hours to approximately
3 hours at a temperature ranging from approximately 40° C to approximately 100° C, enabling the preliminary conden-
sation product to polymerize and harden around the coated red phosphorus particles. The stabilized, encapsulated red
phosphorus particles may then be filtered and dried at an elevated temperature, such as at a temperature ranging from
approximately 80° C to approximately 120° C, in a stream of nitrogen. Stabilized, encapsulated red phosphorus is
commercially available, such as from Clariant GmbH (Frankfurt, Germany). In one embodiment, the stabilized, encap-
sulated red phosphorus is Red Phosphorus HB 801 (TP), which is available from Clariant GmbH.


My easy way to obtain RP encapsulated is to buy this but that chemical product is restricted and follow by police because it can be use for drugs, and I need you help and knowledge for make this chemical in amateur condition.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
elementcollector1
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2684
Registered: 28-12-2011
Location: The Known Universe
Member Is Offline

Mood: Molten

[*] posted on 8-1-2014 at 10:36


I am about to try the synthesis posted by Strepta on page 13 (the attached word document: 'Preparation of Small Amounts of White Phosphorus'), and would like to understand more about preparing sodium hexametaphosphate from sodium orthophosphate. I understand distilling off the phosphoric acid and reacting it with one mole of NaOH to give sodium dihydrogen phosphate, but the next step (melting and then rapidly cooling) is a little unclear. I have not managed to find a melting point for NaH2PO3, and this would determine what apparatus I would use. I believe it might be around 500 C after reading some of the earlier pages, but I'm not sure.



Elements Collected:52/87
Latest Acquired: Cl
Next in Line: Nd
View user's profile View All Posts By User
WGTR
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 964
Registered: 29-9-2013
Location: Online
Member Is Offline

Mood: Outline

[*] posted on 8-1-2014 at 12:21


If I understand what you are asking correctly, I think the melting point of the sodium hexametaphosphate is what's more
important, as the final mixture should be molten before cooling. A quick check with Wiki shows 628°C as a melting
point. I did this some time ago in a Pyrex test tube, but I don't think that the tube survived.

sodium_metaphosphate.jpg - 100kB

The Encyclopaedia Britannica: latest edition. A dictionary of arts, sciences and general literature, Volume 5. Werner, 1902.

As an extra bit of info, I made what I think was NaH2PO4 (it worked in the reaction) by dissolving equal molar amounts of
NaOH and H3PO4 into two separate portions of ethanol. Upon mixing the two solutions together with vigorous stirring, after a
while a precipitate of the NaH2PO4 crashed out. The precipitate didn't appear immediately; in fact, I remember it taking several
minutes to appear. I did this probably a year ago, so I don't remember the exact amounts of everything that I used. It may be
a useful idea, though, for someone who needs a small amount of product quickly.



[Edited on 8-1-2014 by WGTR]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Maya
National Hazard
****




Posts: 263
Registered: 3-10-2006
Location: Mercury
Member Is Offline

Mood: molten

[*] posted on 10-1-2014 at 14:24


" Upon mixing the two solutions together with vigorous stirring, after a
while a precipitate of the NaH2PO4 crashed out."



Really......?

People are using "Crashed" as a term for ppt???????? Really? When did this get approved? Never saw that in Chem Lit......




\"Prefiero ser yo extranjero en otras patrias, a serlo en la mia\"
View user's profile View All Posts By User
otonel
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 83
Registered: 9-4-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 10-1-2014 at 22:48


Can somebody help me with some advice.Plz
Quote:

Red phosphorus stabilized end encapsuled


I open this topic because I don`t find any information about this and what I have is some US patents about this process used to make red phosphorus more stable in time for used in some priming compound.
I want to stabilize and encapsulating RP but my big problem is encapsulating because I don`t have experience in apply a polymer layer in aqueous solution .
I post a piece of text about what I want to do from a European patent EP 1 829 849 A1

Quote:



The red phosphorus may be stabilized by coating particles of the red phosphorus with a metal oxide, such as
a metal hydroxide. The metal oxide may be precipitated on a surface of the red phosphorus particles. The metal oxide
coating functions as a stabilizer to buffer traces of acids that form upon oxidation of the red phosphorus. The metal oxide
may be aluminum hydroxide, bismuth hydroxide, cadmium hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, chromium hydroxide, germanium
hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, manganese hydroxide, niobium hydroxide, silicon hydroxide, tin hydroxide, titanium
hydroxide, zinc hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, or mixtures thereof. The metal oxide may be present in the stabilized,
encapsulated red phosphorus in a total quantity that ranges from approximately 0.1 wt% to approximately 2 wt% based
on the quantity of red phosphorus.
?[0017] Once stabilized, the particles of the red phosphorus may be encapsulated by coating the particles with a
polymer, such as a thermoset resin. Encapsulating the stabilized, red phosphorus particles reduces their active surface
and provides the stabilized, red phosphorus particles with water repellancy and acid resistance. Examples of polymers
that may be used to encapsulate the stabilized, red phosphorus particles include, but are not limited to, an epoxy resin,
melamine resin, phenol formaldehyde resin,? polyurethane resin, or mixtures thereof. The polymer may be present in the
stabilized, encapsulated red phosphorus in a total quantity that ranges from approximately 1 wt% to approximately 5
wt% based on the quantity of red phosphorus. The metal oxide and the polymer may be present in a total quantity of
from approximately 1.1 % wt% to approximately 8 wt% based on the quantity of red phosphorus.
?[0018] The red phosphorus particles may be coated with the metal oxide by mixing an aqueous suspension of the red
phosphorus particles with a water-?soluble metal salt. The pH of the aqueous suspension may be adjusted, precipitating
the metal oxide on the red phosphorus particles. An aqueous solution of a preliminary condensation product of the
polymer may be prepared and added, with mixing, to the coated red phosphorus particles. The solution and the coated
red phosphorus particles may be reacted for a period of time that ranges from approximately 0.5 hours to approximately
3 hours at a temperature ranging from approximately 40° C to approximately 100° C, enabling the preliminary conden-
sation product to polymerize and harden around the coated red phosphorus particles. The stabilized, encapsulated red
phosphorus particles may then be filtered and dried at an elevated temperature, such as at a temperature ranging from
approximately 80° C to approximately 120° C, in a stream of nitrogen. Stabilized, encapsulated red phosphorus is
commercially available, such as from Clariant GmbH (Frankfurt, Germany). In one embodiment, the stabilized, encap-
sulated red phosphorus is Red Phosphorus HB 801 (TP), which is available from Clariant GmbH.


My easy way to obtain RP encapsulated is to buy this but that chemical product is restricted and follow by police because it can be use for drugs, and I need you help and knowledge for make this chemical in amateur condition.

View user's profile View All Posts By User
elementcollector1
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2684
Registered: 28-12-2011
Location: The Known Universe
Member Is Offline

Mood: Molten

[*] posted on 10-1-2014 at 22:56


Why do you want to 'stabilize and encapsulate' it? What use does this have?



Elements Collected:52/87
Latest Acquired: Cl
Next in Line: Nd
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bfesser
Resident Wikipedian
*****




Posts: 2114
Registered: 29-1-2008
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 05:52


Quote: Originally posted by Maya  
People are using "Crashed" as a term for ppt? Really? When did this get approved? Never saw that in Chem Lit.
It's a common way to describe a precipitate that forms very quickly. I can't say for certain that I've seen it in lit., but it's common vernacular/jargon&mdash;at least in English (<a href="http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=crash%20out" target="_blank">ref.</a> <img src="../scipics/_ext.png" />;).



View user's profile View All Posts By User
otonel
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 83
Registered: 9-4-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-1-2014 at 12:18


I want to use RP stabilized and encapsulated in priming mixture with long time of storage, because the stabilized, encapsulated red phosphorus does not react with the O 2 or H 2 O, in contrast to red phosphorus that lacks stabilization. The stabilized, encapsulated red phosphorus may have an increased useful lifetime in the primer composition compared to red phosphorus that lacks stabilization.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
bfesser
Resident Wikipedian
Thread Moved
30-1-2014 at 12:38
bfesser
Resident Wikipedian
Thread Pruned
30-1-2014 at 12:40

  Go To Top