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Author: Subject: Pigments in the art world, for love of brightly colored compounds
chloric1
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[*] posted on 8-11-2015 at 10:21
Don't forget mica pigments


I make metal art and I usually buy ready made paints due to time constraints. I do dabble with additives and pigments though. Although this thread discussed inorganic mineral pigments and the synthetic pigments, I wish to mention the amazing world of mica pigments. They are cheaper than both oxide inorganics and organics. They come in three distinct types, iridescent, pearl, and interference. They may be mixed with a drying oil medium or acrylic polymer medium directly to make custom paints. What I like most about the micas is you can use the transparent or translucent organic pigments to "tint" the mica paints to any desired results. The organic pigments act sort of like a dye without the UV fading affects. If you paint in thin discreet layers of mica paints with various tones, you will be baffled by the brilliance of the finish. Especially after a clear coat is applied.

[Edited on 11/8/2015 by chloric1]




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chloric1
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[*] posted on 8-11-2015 at 10:25
Chemistry in the arts


I make metal art and I usually buy ready made paints due to time constraints. I do dabble with additives and pigments though. Although this thread discussed inorganic mineral pigments and the synthetic pigments, I wish to mention the amazing world of mica pigments. They are cheaper than both oxide inorganics and organics. They come in three distinct types, iridescent, pearl, and interference. They may be mixed with a drying oil medium or acrylic polymer medium directly to make custom paints. What I like most about the micas is you can use the transparent or translucent organic pigments to "tint" the mica paints to any desired results. The organic pigments act sort of like a dye without the UV fading affects. If you paint in thin discreet layers of mica paints with various tones, you will be baffled by the brilliance of the finish. Especially after a clear coat is applied.



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[*] posted on 30-4-2018 at 14:43


Quote: Originally posted by Amos  
http://www.danielsmith.com/ItemImages/Large/P8499B.jpg
Looks pretty enough to me! It's sad that I'm working on pigments of all things and don't even have a cobalt compound on hand.


XD I'm the same way. Just discovered Prussian Blue, and even as a suspension just in water is perfectly fine as a watercolor paint. A little goes a LONG way! I've decided I want to make a chemistry-pigmented card for my girlfriend. I want to add red, but I think my best way is cobalt, yet I have none of. I *do* have lead, but making "red lead" doesn't seem feasible, at least in my opinion. And I don't really have Hg salts either. Maybe I'll revisit the lead idea. Hmm...


P.S. Amos, and Bromic, your pieces are AWESOME!

[Edited on 4/30/2018 by Velzee]




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[*] posted on 1-5-2018 at 18:06


http://colourlex.com/project/cobalt-violet/

Some colors might be difficult to replicate on a computer screen.

Violet is Violet. It isn't purple, and it cannot be mixed from Red and Blue.

It is an odd, pale color.... That is out towards the edge of what most folks can perceive.

I'm not sure the above is actually Violet. But, Cobalt Violet is a nice color, and generally quite expensive to purchase. Guys like us, can make their own.
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[*] posted on 26-5-2018 at 15:27


OK, some of the lovely colors we can see in the real world, will never be seen HERE.

Violet is one of them. https://www.quora.com/Colors-vision-Can-we-see-spectral-viol...

[Edited on 26-5-2018 by zed]
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XeonTheMGPony
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[*] posted on 27-5-2018 at 19:35


Quote: Originally posted by Etaoin Shrdlu  
Yeah, cadmium sulfide is expensive. It's a specialty pigment. Nothing to do with purity, it has to do with the fact that it's only used in the art world. Pigments that get used to color polymers, coatings, are the big movers and the cost goes down.

Go compare the cost of yellow oxide to potting soil now. ;)

EDIT: According to Wikipedia cadmium sulfide has some use still in high-temperature coatings, but this is still a specialty use. Cadmium pigments all but went the way of the dodo when non-toxic organic replacements were produced.

[Edited on 3-17-2015 by Etaoin Shrdlu]


Cadmium sulfide is all so used in photo resisters for flame detector sensors, and automatic light modules

[Edited on 28-5-2018 by XeonTheMGPony]
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[*] posted on 11-6-2018 at 14:43


Huh? No more Cadmium Yellow?

Seems like it is the standard color, for the yellow-orange line, down the center of U.S. streets.

Must be using a different pigment, to achieve the same color?

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:zt1DlK...

Aha, some of these paints were found to contain Cadmium.



[Edited on 11-6-2018 by zed]

[Edited on 11-6-2018 by zed]

[Edited on 11-6-2018 by zed]
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