Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Does anyone have any experience working with Persulfate compounds?
Electra
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 179
Registered: 11-12-2013
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 31-5-2014 at 14:38
Does anyone have any experience working with Persulfate compounds?


Persulfate, alongside Oxone/Monopersulfate are both strong oxidzers. Persulfate has a stronger oxidation potential, but is known to be more stable in solution.

I had read bits, but haven't been able to find many reliable sources, stating that Persulfate is stable until it is heated. It allegedly decomposes into the active oxidizing sulfate radicals above 50 degrees. Meaning, once activated by temperature it becomes extremely reactive. So for uses in swimming pools and other applications, below the activation temperature it is extremely unreactive as an oxidant, but once activated, it becomes extremely active?

Does anyone have any experience or information with this. Persulfate compounds, such as Ammonium Persulfate, are much more affordable and have much higher solubility than Oxone.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
kristofvagyok
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 659
Registered: 6-4-2012
Location: Europe
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 31-5-2014 at 16:23


I worked with potassium persulfate and ammonium persulfate. The potassium persulfate, since it's limited solubility, did not react under the reaction conditions what I needed, the ammonium persulfate turned the whole reaction into a black gunk.

The title reaction in my case was an oxidation where I tried to turn furan into diacetoxy-dihydrofuran. At the end, potassium bromate was found to be the optimal oxidant for the reaction.




I have a blog where I post my pictures from my work: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/
-Pictures from chemistry, check it out(:

"You can’t become a chemist and expect to live forever."
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Electra
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 179
Registered: 11-12-2013
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 31-5-2014 at 16:34


My main interest is in the oxidation of halide ions, bromide, chloride, iodide, fluoride, etc. Oxone can oxidize these relatively easy and very cleanly, with a mere water wash yielding a clean product.

Though, your black gunk comment concerns me. Do you know if this was caused by some cross-reaction reaction, or directly because of the ammonium persulfate? Ammonium Persulfate after oxidation just yields Ammonium Sulfate, so I am not sure how that would directly cause black gunk.

Do you have any information with regard to speed of activation and heat needed for the activation of this persulfate?
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Magpie
lab constructor
*****




Posts: 5939
Registered: 1-11-2003
Location: USA
Member Is Offline

Mood: Chemistry: the subtle science.

[*] posted on 31-5-2014 at 17:52


I used sodium persufate to oxidize benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde:

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=26075

garage chemist used it to make SO3. See the Prepublication forum for his procedure.



[Edited on 1-6-2014 by Magpie]




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Electra
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 179
Registered: 11-12-2013
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 31-5-2014 at 19:51


Quote: Originally posted by Magpie  
I used sodium persufate to oxidize benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde:

http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=26075

garage chemist used it to make SO3. See the Prepublication forum for his procedure.



[Edited on 1-6-2014 by Magpie]


Thanks for the link!

The main thing that concerns me is how exothermic the reaction is in comparison to oxone. I suppose it differs depending on the compound being oxidized. I am hoping to oxidize bromide. Suppose I will just have to try to really know. The biggest thing about oxone is the horrible solubility. It requires nearly 10x more water than ammonium persulfate.
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top