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Author: Subject: Getting rid of Fe2O3 and CuO after electrolysis
Blind Angel
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[*] posted on 9-12-2002 at 09:32
Getting rid of Fe2O3 and CuO after electrolysis


I tried to electrolyse a Phoron/HCl substance and now my solution is filled with Ferrous and Copper Oxyde. How can i get rid of these oxyde, i tried to filter them but there still some which stay :(



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[*] posted on 9-12-2002 at 09:58


You probably have extremely fine particles in your solution. Try filtering the solution through a layer of celite (diatomaceous earth).
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Blind Angel
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[*] posted on 9-12-2002 at 15:08


Where can i find that?



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[*] posted on 9-12-2002 at 17:43


It´s not really necessary to use celite or expensive small-poric filter papers.
Just repeat the filtering using one and the same filter paper several times.
The pores will get smaller and smaller with every filtering step anyway.

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[*] posted on 9-12-2002 at 17:49


If this doesn´t work try aging the oxides(means let it stand some days).
Aging means small particles accumulate to give bigger particles which are more easily filterable.

Chemists use this method as some precipitates tend to pass even the finest filter papers.

HLR
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Blind Angel
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[*] posted on 10-12-2002 at 14:29


Since i'm very low-budget, will coffee filter do?



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[*] posted on 11-12-2002 at 02:38


Just try.....if the pores of the coffee filter turn out to be just too big, then the formerly proposed aging and the use of celite(=kieselguhr, w i d e l y used in construction economy as isolating material, additive for concrete and for asphalts furthermore used in metal-scouring agents and for producing water-glass) would be the way to go.
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[*] posted on 1-2-2014 at 15:16


what about aluminum sulfate? this acts as a coagulant agent so you will be able to decant all or filter and get a nice clean solution.



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[*] posted on 2-2-2014 at 06:44


CuO reacts very easily with HCl
iron oxides should be able to be taken care of by boiling the mess with citric acid and perhaps some H2O2
however... this phoron thingy might get dangerous if you add H2O2 to it
boiling AP solution is something you only wanna do to show what NOT to do.. lol

you should of used graphite sealed in cloth tho..
if the cloth is wrapped tightly around with plastic / organic wire it could potentially keep the graphite anode perfectly intact, microfiber cloth should work, although nobody has tested this




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[*] posted on 24-2-2014 at 09:30


Coagulant agents such as ferrous sulfate might help you. Then your only worry is to get it out of solution. The tiny particles will coalesce and precipitate much more easily.



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