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Author: Subject: Induction heating
Quince
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[*] posted on 29-11-2006 at 19:16


You can buy a decent scope for $100 on eBay.



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Contrabasso
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[*] posted on 6-4-2008 at 03:41


Can I actually and legally buy a small (1kW max) induction furnace? ebay? mail order? UK supplier?
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microcosmicus
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[*] posted on 6-4-2008 at 08:06


Legality isn't an issue unless you were planning to steal a furnace.
Rather the problem is in finding a furnace of that size ---- AFAIK,
the overwhelming majority of induction furnaces are much bigger
affairs used in places such as foundries or scrap metal recyclers.
You might have better luck finding yourself an induction heater
such as is used for heat treatment of small parts and similar small
jobs, then building a small furnace from copper pipe and refractory
material which could be connected to the power supply of the heater.

For instance, here is an advertisement for an induction heater in
the power range you are interested in:

http://djvmerchandise.com/pro1161217.html

If you look around, you might find one for a lower price or locate
a used unit for sale.

[Edited on 6-4-2008 by microcosmicus]
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Twospoons
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[*] posted on 6-4-2008 at 14:09


Better still, get a portable bench-top induction cooker (~$100 used), gut it, and rebuild into a furnace. That should be good for 1-2 kW.



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evil_lurker
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[*] posted on 6-4-2008 at 14:20


Quote:
Originally posted by Twospoons
Better still, get a portable bench-top induction cooker (~$100 used), gut it, and rebuild into a furnace. That should be good for 1-2 kW.


That is what I was thinking.

You could theoretically cast a small refractory furnace, put a steel or iron plate in the bottom, and then use it to melt aluminum or other low m.p. metals.




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12AX7
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[*] posted on 6-4-2008 at 19:22


Sadly, induction cooktops aren't the right impedance or frequency to operate the kind of coils needed for a furnace or other general work.

Tim




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microcosmicus
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[*] posted on 6-4-2008 at 21:08


More specifically, since they work via the magnetization of iron,
they won't do diddlysquat above the Curie point of iron. Hence, if
you did as you proposed with the iron plate, you would find out
that your furnace would not go above 770C.

While such a furnace would not be good enough for tasks like
welting steel or brass, it should work for melting low melting
point metals, calcining, dehydrating, pyrolysis. annealing glass,
firing earthenware and other such applications around the lab.

For higher temperatures, you need to make use of the skin effect,
which means radio frequency.
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