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Author: Subject: Make diamonds in the microwave?
DrP
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[*] posted on 18-11-2005 at 03:50


I was talking about Frank's initial post.

Chill out man. :cool: :P
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neophyte
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[*] posted on 13-12-2005 at 07:16


After reading the above post I have decided to throw in my two cents worth. I have studied diamonds quiet extensively , and it is of note that in most instances either chromium or titinium are found in close proximity . While the heat and pressure method has proven to be viable to make big diamonds , I have a theory that diamonds could be basically produced on your table top ( microwave or what the hell ever ). Diamond is destroyed by chromium trioxide at 100° C , if we extrapulate that newtons third law follows in all things (For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction) then from my junk science calculations then diamonds must be able to be created at close to the same energy as it takes to destroy them . The catalyst would seem to be a compound of chromium , and a much lower temp than is perscribed in the high pressure method. When one studies the kimberlite pipes it is evident that after a certain depth the diamonds seem to play out , which would indicate that the temp is not near as high as the artificial method used to produce them . Also of note is the fact that diamonds come in more than just the cubic system , from plates to isomorphic . Also if interest is the inclusions that are found in diamond crystals , some of which while rare would give the indication that there is more than one way that C is converted to diamond . Interest is also generated in the fact that the largest percentages of diamond are C12 with a smaller amound of C13 , yet that certain diamonds have been found with larger amounds of C13 and are harder than the traditional C12 diamond . Hopefully someone will figure out how to make diamonds on thier desk top , however I am still working on the silicates : I know that I am out of my league with diamonds.
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neutrino
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[*] posted on 13-12-2005 at 14:28


>Diamond is destroyed by chromium trioxide at 100° C , if we extrapulate that newtons third law follows in all things

Sorry, this isn't quite going to fly. This is like saying that if we burn a lump of coal, we can get it back by compressing the CO<sub>2</sub> formed and heating...
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neophyte
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[*] posted on 13-12-2005 at 20:34


Interestingly enough CO2 and CO are the basic feed materials in the use of high pressure diamonds . So that does not lead one to the conclusion that it would not also make coal . Coal is also a differnt item than graphite as coal is composed of many aromic hydrocarbons including methane interestingly enough while graphite ( a common inclusion in diamonds ) is close to pure C. In the normal production of synthetic diamonds an activated H molecule is injected into a plasma with methane , Though graphite has also been used as a feed material Also of note is the fact that CO and CO2 have both been used as the feed material in the freedman synthesis : though the tempture of that sythesis was much higher approaching 700°C . British patent 1,476,313 and once you have a source of C, the O could be stripped off and that would lead right back to the original GE patent . However as stated before by myself this whole idea is just a postulation on my part .


http://www.24carat.co.uk/diamondframe.html



NO , that does not get back to making coal , however if I recall correctly that is supposed to be an anerobic process using hydrocarbons from plant materials , and there is surely a release of H molecules during oxidation , if just in the release of H20. And once again I am not sure if anyone has sythesized coal , so how can we be totally certain how it is manufactured .
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neophyte
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[*] posted on 13-12-2005 at 21:06


http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/diamond.html
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Quince
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[*] posted on 5-7-2006 at 04:40


Hey, I took the deflection yoke ferrite core from a monitor's picture tube, and it wonderfully heats up in the microwave, certainly better than the smaller ferrites I've tried.



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franklyn
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[*] posted on 21-7-2006 at 10:20


How about ball milling a coal slurry,

with free hydrogen as a by product !

http://www.whatsnextnetwork.com/technology/index.php/2006/06...

.
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simple
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[*] posted on 26-7-2006 at 16:30


Apparently Russians have try to make diamond dust successfully by shooting high power (speed) graphite projectile in to the graphite wall. Energy of the impact (high temperature and pressure) produced diamond dust. But I guess not much of it...
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Quince
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[*] posted on 26-7-2006 at 18:16


LMAO, such a Russian solution.



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Rich_Lather
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[*] posted on 11-8-2006 at 13:44


Diamond synthesis interested me a few years ago, but the only form that I could afford was the CVD type of synthesis. Alpha diamond has been in and out of the news with their synthesis of diamonds for the past few years, and I have read their patents.

Their setup, which they are highly protective of, seems similar to a farnsworth fusor

http://www.brian-mcdermott.com/fusion_is_easy.htm

off of

http://fusor.net/

The reaction vessel and the vacuum pump seem to be the most expensive parts of the initial setup (along with the gieger counter if you so wish). Have any of you looked into or tried either CVD or fusors?

I might add that CVD is a very low pressure operation using plasma, not high pressure, high heat.

[Edited on 11-8-2006 by Rich_Lather]
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Quince
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[*] posted on 11-8-2006 at 20:11


Fusors are dangerous. The lead shielding from gamma is not going to stop much of neutrons; you need more shielding for that.



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12AX7
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[*] posted on 11-8-2006 at 21:30


Get something with a lot of barns.

I forget what common metals are good for that. Hafnium obviously isn't very common or cheap. Maybe surround it with wax (1H content) and boric acid.

Tim




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not_important
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[*] posted on 11-8-2006 at 22:14


Note that the neutron absorbtion cross sction depends on the energy of the neutron; thus as 12AX7 said you want light atomic weight stuff to drop neutron energy and stuff that has a large cross section for thermal neutrons.

Lithum and boron are the common and cheap absorbers, cadmium is good, sodium and managanese have spikes in the few hundred to several KeV range. Xenon135 is real good in the slow to thermal range, so is gadolinium.


Section 4 of this looks as if it might be useful

http://www.kayelaby.npl.co.uk/toc/

edit

In many of the neutron absorption reactions, gamma radiation is given off. You want your hi-Z gamma shielding outside the neutron shielding

[Edited on 12-8-2006 by not_important]
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Rich_Lather
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[*] posted on 12-8-2006 at 07:54


I hardly think neutron emissions is a prohibiting factor. Do it remotely. Do it in your basement or out in your storage shed, or jacket the reaction vessel with a solution of boric acid solution.
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Quince
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[*] posted on 14-8-2006 at 11:41


I think some people use water or wax bricks.



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