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Author: Subject: Catalysts for H2O2
mericad193724
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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 07:25
Catalysts for H2O2


Hello,

I have been using Manganese Dioxide to catalize the decomposition of H2O2 into water and oxygen. Manganese Dioxide is a problem because it turns water dark brown even in small quantities. Does anyone know of any other soluble catalysts for H2O2. I read somewhere that salts of certain metals may work.

I would really appreciate some help.

Thanks,

mericad193724
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Maja
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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 07:28


Actually if you will use button "SEARCH" you will find big topic on your subject.
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mericad193724
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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 08:02


Sorry, I should have done a search first.

Anyway...I did a lot of searching and found that Potassium Permanganate and Iodine can act as catalysts, both of which are soluble.

Are there any others?

thanks,

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unionised
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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 10:10


Blood works though it's not strictly a solution IIRC there's a coblat tartrate complex that works too. What do you want the stuff for?
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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 10:24


I was wondering the same. Generally with this reaction it seems the goal is to obtain 02 for some purpose; why is the water important?
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neutrino
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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 12:14


Potassium permanganate will react with hydrogen peroxide to form manganese dioxide. If you are concerned about MnO<sub>2</sub>, avoid KMnO<sub>4</sub>.



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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 15:37


As said, use the search engine. There are at least two threads that I can recall but only one that I found within 15 seconds of searching:

https://sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=4266




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[*] posted on 4-6-2006 at 20:55


Quote:
Originally posted by unionised
Blood works though it's not strictly a solution IIRC there's a coblat tartrate complex that works too. What do you want the stuff for?


I hear liver is a good source too(lots of blood go figure). But if you want something goopy as opposed to a liquid then liver might be a better choice?
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[*] posted on 5-6-2006 at 02:03


Wouln't LOTS of transition metal salts do? Like Cu, Co, Ni, Fe compounds?



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mericad193724
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[*] posted on 5-6-2006 at 05:37


thanks for the help guys,

I am trying to avoid aything that is not soluble and will strongly change the color of the water.

This is somewhat for a school related project, I use my chemistry teacher's lab for my expeiments after school. Im not making anything dangerous.

I was thinking catalase, the enzyme that makes liver work, could work for me...but my catalyst needs to be a dry powder, I tried veal liver, but I can't squeeze the liquid and evaporate it, I don't think you can get powdered catalase.

What transition metals will due, can you name some compounds, Ferric Chloride maybe, Zinc Cloride???

thanks a lot,

meriad193724
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[*] posted on 5-6-2006 at 08:00


Mix manganese dioxide with sodium silicate. Add some acid to make silicagel. Let it dry. Use the large, black, filtrable crystals as your fully reciclable catalyst.

As described here:

http://sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=2197
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mericad193724
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[*] posted on 5-6-2006 at 09:51


hello,

just one more question,

when you get 3% or 6% H2O2 from a pharmacy it says it is "stabilized. " What does this mean, is there some additive that makes it less reactive or something???

What is the process by which it is "stabilized."

thanks,

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[*] posted on 5-6-2006 at 10:48


The ingredients list shows phosphoric acid, I bet. Read labels........

Tim




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[*] posted on 5-6-2006 at 14:32


Any halide salt should catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, assuming it is concentrated enough. Use potassium iodide for best results.
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