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Author: Subject: Low melting salt mixtures
PHILOU Zrealone
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[*] posted on 20-8-2015 at 08:50


@Fulmen,
Just asking:
Is the corrosion of your steel pieces not a problem?
I suspect molten nitrate 200-400°C might be rude to them; so will chlorides...




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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 20-8-2015 at 09:03


Corrosion shouldn't be a problem with nitrates. It will probably oxidize the surface, but it should only form a thin layer.



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sussyn
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[*] posted on 21-8-2015 at 07:29


I have extra KNO2 if you're also interested in nitrite eutectics. Gotta check shipping costs etc, I'm not too experienced with the exept quantities rules since ORM-D went away, but I'll be happy to learn. There might be some NaNO2 hiding somewhere, too, or I can get some.
Good luck!
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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 21-8-2015 at 11:53


Thank you for the offer, but I think I'll focus on the nitrates for now. This whole project has been delayed as my shop access has been severely restricted lately. But hopefully that will sort itself out during the winter, it would be nice to have this done by that time...



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Praxichys
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[*] posted on 21-8-2015 at 15:59


Lithium salts aren't that hard to come by. Lithium carbonate can be had for about $12/lb. The carbonate is a great point to start making lithium salts; all that is needed is to treat it with various acids.

Just a thought.

http://www.axner.com/lithium-carbonate-fine.aspx




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Fulmen
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[*] posted on 21-8-2015 at 23:48


That is a fair point, I'll look into that.



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The Volatile Chemist
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[*] posted on 23-8-2015 at 14:03


I saw the same thing on continentalclay.com. 1lb pack. Not too bad price-wise.



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chloric1
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[*] posted on 4-2-2018 at 04:50
Lithium salts


I have been trying to find the patent but no luck. Basically, the premise is if you start with lithium chloride and sodium nitrate( also bromide,iodide etc), you would mix strong solutions of the two then raise temperature to reduce volume causing NaCl to drop out. You FILTER HOT and keep reducing volume until another crop of NaCl drops out. Filter hot again. Now you have a strong lithium nitrate solution still contaminated with sodium chloride and perhaps unreacted lithium chloride and sodium nitrate. No here is where it gets interesting. Lithium salts have an uncanny ability to dissolve in polar organic solvents like methanol, ethanol, and acetone. So , as long as your lithium chloride is not in excess, you should be able to add excess alcohol or acetone to salt mix to drop out more sodium chloride as this will shift the equilibrium in favor. Filter again and evaporate your filtrate. Next to seal the deal, take crystal residue and dissolve in neat acetone or alcohol. This should virtually eliminate any further sodium from the lithium nitrate.

This is tedious but cost effective as you would not handle nitric acid. Lithium chloride solution is easily generated by adding the pottery grade lithium carbonate to diluted muriatic acid from home improvement store. Add slight excess of lithium carbonate to remove dissolved metals like iron from acid solution. Hope this is helpful.




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byko3y
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[*] posted on 4-2-2018 at 17:18


chloric1, dunno why you are thinking to mess with LiCl if you have Li2CO3 as a starting material. Solubility of lithium nitrate is only slightly higher in alcohol and acetone than solubility of lithium chloride. In this way you will get a mixture of LiCl+LiNO3.
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S.C. Wack
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[*] posted on 5-2-2018 at 13:23


Weird how so many mixtures are supposed to melt at 145C. Fieser says 10 parts KNO3 7 parts NaNO2. Others replace some K with Na: 53:40:7. Or nitrates of K (65.8) and Ca (34.2). Even more Na for 142C: 44.2% KNO3, 48.9% NaNO2, 6.9% NaNO3 google says.



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