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Author: Subject: Information on a compound?
Agari
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[*] posted on 20-11-2015 at 18:21
Information on a compound?


While doing some reading into a compound to use for the synthesis of nitric acid, I came across a certain compound called phosgene oxime (Cl2C=N-OH) that can be prepared by the reduction of chloropicrin. My source also says that phosgene oxime can be reacted with sodium hydroxide to yield hydroxylamine and an ionic compound with the formula H3O[SnCl3]. I was not able to find any information regarding H3O[SnCl3] , does anyone have any idea what it is? I am interested in the hydroxylamine and possibly H3O[SnCl3] products.

[Edited on 21-11-2015 by Agari]




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[*] posted on 20-11-2015 at 18:28


Confusion. Where did the tin come from?
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Agari
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[*] posted on 20-11-2015 at 18:30


Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
Confusion. Where did the tin come from?

It is part of the reduction reaction as follows:
Cl3CNO2(Chloropicrin) + 2 Sn + 5 HCl + H2O → Cl2C=N−OH(Phosgene oxime) + 2 H3O[SnCl3]

[Edited on 21-11-2015 by Agari]




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[*] posted on 20-11-2015 at 18:45


Ok, that's clearer.
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deltaH
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[*] posted on 20-11-2015 at 21:51


H3O[SnCl3] is formed from SnCl2 + HCl + H2O, if that helps. It's easier to understand when you write it with its charges shown, i.e. [H3O+][SnCl3-]

SnCl2 can complex to chloride ions to form the [SnCl3-] anion. If conditions are acidic and there's no alkali metal cations present, then what you have is the hydrated trichlorostannous acid, for want of a better name, i.e the adduct of hydrochloric acid and stannous chloride.

[Edited on 21-11-2015 by deltaH]




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ave369
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[*] posted on 21-11-2015 at 01:21


Most compounds with the hydronium ion H3O+ are in fact solvated forms of acids. Only rarely stable solid hydronium salts do exist, and only if the acids are very strong (example: H3OClO4). What we are speaking about here is probably trichlorostannous acid HSnCl3.

Also, be extremely careful about phosgene oxime. It is a military urticant agent. It will mess up your skin pretty badly in case of any contact with it.




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Nicodem
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21-11-2015 at 02:30
Agari
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[*] posted on 22-11-2015 at 16:11


Quote: Originally posted by ave369  
Most compounds with the hydronium ion H3O+ are in fact solvated forms of acids. Only rarely stable solid hydronium salts do exist, and only if the acids are very strong (example: H3OClO4). What we are speaking about here is probably trichlorostannous acid HSnCl3.

Is there anything else I need to know about it? What are we looking at in terms of additional precautions, such as those used for fuming nitric acid?




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