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Author: Subject: substance that creates heat
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[*] posted on 4-5-2003 at 19:01
substance that creates heat


I need help from someone that has chemestry experties. I was wondering if there was a substance or material that would create a moderate amount of heat when in contact with water or moisture. Preferably a non-toxic material/substance. Or possibly a substance that does not drop below freezeing. I have an Idea for a new product so any help with this would greatly beneifit us both financially. Any good ideas e-mail me at smyth915@aol.com thanks in advance.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2003 at 19:28


Well i'm not sure if this is what your looking for, but Calcium carbide, Sodium, and Potassium all generate some heat when they make contact with water, but not enough to warm anything of any extent, and it wouldn't be a good idea to breath the fumes for any lenght of time. Hopfully this was of some help, but as far as something that would produce enough heat to warm a house or something I don't know of a substance that exsits.
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[*] posted on 4-5-2003 at 20:27


If you mean melting the snow so you don't have to shove it (like i want to), salt can be a start but not enough, the other idea i had is not exactly chemistry but a net of iron wire plugged on DC with resistor can do the job... sodium and other alkali metal wont be i good idea i think since they react very violently, no idea for the calcium carbide though



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[*] posted on 5-5-2003 at 00:50


If its a solid material you are after which will produce considerable heat when dissolved/added to water, yet not create a violent reaction then sodium hydroxide is your best bet. As a pure substanse it IS toxic, but it will not create toxic fumes on reaction with water. With the right amount you can get water from simply warm or to boiling hot by adding the right amount. It can also easily be bought at the supermarket.
What is it you need such a substance for?
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[*] posted on 5-5-2003 at 01:05


Calcium Oxide (quicklime) reacts with water to produce calcium hydroxide and heat. This reaction is used in some self-heating food cans.



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[*] posted on 5-5-2003 at 07:54


What exactly are you looking for? Are you looking for something that will resist freezing or something that will warm something up to keep people warm, like a handwarmer. Or is it something that will cook food from a chemical reaction? This will help us very much in order to solve your problem.
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[*] posted on 5-5-2003 at 19:58


Sodium hydroxide and water, along with sufuric acid and water.

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[*] posted on 6-5-2003 at 01:36


You could use a mix of ammmonium nitrate 28%, ammonium chloride 3%, and zinc dust 69%, by weight. This mix will ignite on contact with water.



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[*] posted on 6-5-2003 at 08:12


The bad thing about that mix is that the ammonium nitrate draws in water (hydroscopic) and the moisture content evenually makes the mixute spontaneously combust. Good luck when the first kid with sweaty hands opens up the packet to 'see what's inside'. If the packaging is something such as a sealed tin with a 'fresh lock' or something simliar on top, it might work. Pull the tab, add water, cook food. Seems like it would work well for MREs too. Soldiers could just spit into the can for it to start burning. Or it could be used effectively as 'emergency fire source'. The could be sealed tightly and stored in first aid kits, hiker bags, etc. When they get lost and need something to start their fire and they have no matches, they could just build a 'tent' of wood. Then they can pull the top off and get it wet somehow. The green flame can also be used as a signal flare, depending how the material is packaged or pressed.
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