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Author: Subject: Aspirator/Water outlet for home
dumbsnake
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 17:10
Aspirator/Water outlet for home


Hey all,

I have lurked a bit and I really like this forum. I finally gave in and bought a bunch of glassware. Unfortunately I don't have one of those chem lab water spigots. I'd like to get something so that I can hook up my distillation setup. Also, I need to get an aspirator. I've been searching around and everywhere I find they are selling products that I can't hook up to my faucet at home. I spent about an hour at the hardware store trying to figure out a possibliity here. What have you all done? Thanks for any help.
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 17:17


Are you trying to connect to a standard US kitchen sink with aerator?



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dumbsnake
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 17:27


That is what I have, but I took off the aerator and measured it and everything. I'm open to any ideas that could work. My sink head is 13/16" with 27 thread.

[Edited on 20-4-2007 by dumbsnake]
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The_Davster
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 17:31


I have one that looks like the one on wikipedia, or at least in terms of connections. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspirator

It does not fit to standard faucet screw threads, so I brought the aspirator to home depot and asked the guy in home depot's plumbing section to help me get all the connectors to connect it to my tap. He found all necessary connectors within 40s or so.




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Magpie
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 17:32


This is from an earlier post of mine:

Quote:

I use a kitchen sink tap with internal (female) threads. I bought a chrome plated brass aereator with the same thread size (only male), gutted it, and soldered my brass aspirator to it.


The soldering is a little tricky, but it worked.




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bio2
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 17:44


If you can't readily find the adapter parts just use a
piece of plastic tubing secured with 2 hose clamps.
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Magpie
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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 18:56


Here's a photo of the adaptor I made using an aereator and a brass 1/2" x 3/8" coupling, pipe threads. As you can see the soldering job is crude. But it is watertight and worked just fine. Aspirators come with 3/8" male pipe threads in my experience.

adaptor.jpg - 73kB




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[*] posted on 20-4-2007 at 23:10


The easiest way of dealing with this is to take a rubber stopper and some glass tubing. Fit the stopper with about 5cm of glasss tubing snugly to the faucet and that's it. When using aspirator I fit the in-end of the aspirator to another stopper and secure it to the faucet with clamp.
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MadHatter
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[*] posted on 21-4-2007 at 17:48
Barbed Connector


Magpie soldered his own pieces together and made a connector. I found a combination
of parts and Home Depot that ends up at a barbed connector off my faucet. It just
took some searching and some Teflon tape to make a working arrangement.




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chemrox
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[*] posted on 21-4-2007 at 20:22


you can go over the faucet with plastic tubing and a hose clamp. Then over the aspirator with tubing and another hose clamp. You can get a lab type faucet .. ie one with a high curve at home depot for under $60. And while you're there you could shop for connecting hardware to go to the inside female threads in the faucet. Finally, I had an apsirator that was designed for emptying water beds and was made to hook to an outside faucet. This worked well on laundy sinks and may still be available.
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visitation123
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[*] posted on 26-4-2007 at 11:05
environment


water aspirators using faucets as you call them in your part of the world is a waste of water, forgetting the hassles required to connect it.

Why don't you focus your efforts on building an aspirator station? All your missing is a pond pump.


See here:
.

http://www.erowid.org/archive/rhodium/chemistry/equipment/as...
http://www.erowid.org/archive/rhodium/chemistry/equipment/pi...
http://www.erowid.org/archive/rhodium/chemistry/equipment/pi...
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chemrox
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[*] posted on 27-4-2007 at 02:05


or buy a vacuum pump on ebay of labx for less than the cost of one of these time and space consuming projects
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MadHatter
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[*] posted on 27-4-2007 at 20:04
Vacuum Pump


I have a vacuum pump but there's no way in hell I'm going to use it for nitric acid vacuum
distillation. My glass aspirator is used for that purpose.




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visitation123
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[*] posted on 29-4-2007 at 07:31


Exactly, without modification the aspirator passes distillates directly into solution.
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uchiacon
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[*] posted on 27-8-2009 at 21:17


However a vacuum pump can go far below an aspirator, and if you can get one cheaply (under $100) it might be best to use that with a vapour trap yes? 10torr or less for nitric distilatin would mean that it'd boil at a very low temp.
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[*] posted on 27-8-2009 at 23:33


The aspirator I've acquired I got to hook directly to my hose outside. I've then attached a long tube into my work place.

I have a several aspirators that are stuck onto the faucets they've been connected to for probably 50 years. I also have one other set up that can also connect to the hose. As for the sinks I don't know if they are standard sinks, and the aspirators are attached in a weird way but if that is of any interest to you we could make a trade or something. PM if you want I guess.





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Phosphor-ing
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[*] posted on 28-8-2009 at 05:39


In the US this is a quite affordable option.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnu...




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uchiacon
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[*] posted on 31-8-2009 at 23:06


I think I might try to design my own aspirator, although my limited means may cause some problems. I found a good book named "organic chem lab survival guide" by James Zubrick. It has some good diagrams in it for the aspirator, vapour traps etc.

So, lets say I have a slightly smaller inlet tube flowing into a slightly large T joint with the adjecent part with a hose barb for a vacuum tube. So theres still a tiny gap between the water flowing through the T joint and the T joint itself. So I'd assume that the tiny gap would allow the venturi effect and it would work. And is it best to have the outlet tapering in or out? I will probably find it hard to make a tapered outlet, but just in case, which is better?

Alternatively, a T joint with an icing nozzle in it( I think this was discussed somewhere) which would be similiar to this diagram.
The icing nozzle would be better than just a smaller tube going into a larger one I presume? More pressure = bigger vacuum?

Oh, and a last thing, lab aspirators will always outperform home made ones right? I might be able to get a metal one from the uni, but I'll try and make this one anyway.

air_tech_drawing_big.gif - 27kB
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kclo4
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[*] posted on 1-9-2009 at 05:19


I remember frogfot's website had a nice DIY aspirator, does anyone happen to have his pages saved? His site has unfortunately gone under, I've been looking for an archive of it for a while, I haven't search to hard, but I haven't had much luck.



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[*] posted on 1-9-2009 at 07:24


I really don't think it worth the hassle of buikding your own aspirator.. it's the kind of thing you are better off just buying, they are cheap and relatively availble.. Very precise measure are required to get a decent vacuum, not just any T shaped plumbing will do the trick..

Once you have that piece, construction a aspirator station is pretty simple and cheap, and saves alot of water, and able sone to neutralize any fumes that are trapped int he water. Just add some Na2CO3 to the water and a smalll amount of TCCA or similar to avoid rusting and molding/rotting of the wtaer (thanks to Bio for this tip). Always worked wonders for me, get routine 25mmHg with cold water with a teflon aspiratoir that cost me 20e..




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uchiacon
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[*] posted on 1-9-2009 at 19:42


What did visitation say about a pond pump?
My pump is rated for 30 PSI at 46L/min, I guess I just have to sell it and buy a less powerful one then.

Any suggestions for a low L/min pump with high PSI?

I saw somebody had a 120PSI pump with a 5L/min flow rate on trademe...

Would a beverage pump work? or would it cough out after a bit? Coz all these pond pumps seem to be A. submersible and B. not high enough pressure.

[Edited on 04-07-09 by uchiacon]

[Edited on 04-07-09 by uchiacon]
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[*] posted on 6-9-2009 at 02:41


There is a UK lab supplier doing a polypropylene filter pump for about £12 and a couple of other filter pumps in different materials for lots more money. Does anyone have a UK supplier for a glass filter pump?

I too do not want to pull 99% nitric through a mechanical pump with pump oil!

I wondered whether the V2O5 process for H2S04 could be driven by a filter pump pulling the SO3 into recirculating dilute acid.
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[*] posted on 6-9-2009 at 04:01


To recirculate the dilute (and eventually conc) acid you would need a completly corrosion proof pump because otherwise it would get attacked by the acid.
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[*] posted on 6-9-2009 at 05:58


Quote: Originally posted by Contrabasso  
I wondered whether the V2O5 process for H2S04 could be driven by a filter pump pulling the SO3 into recirculating dilute acid.
You don't want to be dissolving SO3 directly in anything like a dilute solution. That reaction is violently exothermic, which is why in a commercial plant they dissolve it in concentrated acid. The now-even-more concentrated acid is diluted (again exothermic) elsewhere, again where they can manage the heat release.
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[*] posted on 6-9-2009 at 18:59


It's not just the exothermic nature, it's that the SO3 tends to form fine droplets of H2SO4 that are difficult to collect or absorb into dilute acid or water, but concentrated H2SO4 absorbs the SO3 without the formation of droplets. With diluted acid the SO3 is in part reacting with the water vapour, that's the source of the fine droplets; acid of a high enough concentration has very little water vapour over it.

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