Copper(II) acetylsalicylate

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Copper(II) acetylsalicylate
Copper aspirinate.JPG
Names
IUPAC name
Dicopper 2-acetyloxybenzoate
Other names
Copper(II) aspirinate
Cupric acetylsalicylate
Cupric aspirin complex
Cupric aspirinate
Tetrakis-μ-acetylsalicylato-dicopper(II)
Properties
C36H28Cu2O16
Molar mass 843.69 g/mol
Appearance Bright blue crystalline solid
Melting point 248–255 °C (478–491 °F; 521–528 K) (decomposition)
Boiling point Decomposes
Insoluble
Hazards
Safety data sheet None
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Related compounds
Acetylsalicylic acid
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Copper(II) acetylsalicylate, or copper aspirinate, as it is sometimes called, is a compound of copper and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin).

Properties

Chemical

This little-known compound is a chelating agent that shows promise as a drug for rheumatoid arthritis.

Physical

Copper aspirinate is a richly colored blue solid that is insoluble in water.

Availability

Copper(II) acetylsalicylate is produced in the lab, rather than obtained elsewhere.

Preparation

Copper(II) acetylsalicylate can be produced by the combination of solutions containing a copper(II) salt and sodium acetylsalicylate in a 1-to-2 molar ratio, respectively.

Projects

Copper aspirinate may be usable as a blue pigment for various projects. It is also an intriguing specimen to add to a copper compounds collection.

Handling

Safety

Copper aspirinate does not demonstrate the toxicity of most copper(II) compounds. However, lab grade material should never be ingested. Additionally, large amounts of salicylate can cause a serious medical condition, salicylism.

Storage

Copper aspirinate should be stored in closed containers.

Disposal

Copper aspirinate can be mixed with a flammable solvent and safely burned. It can also be neutralized with Fenton's reagent if needed.

The resulting copper wastes should be recycled.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads