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Author: Subject: Make Potassium (from versuchschemie.de)
symboom
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[*] posted on 26-6-2017 at 08:18


I wish I knew russian tgere so much I miss just because the some videos are in another language

Great repurposing I would have thrown away my co2 canister
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5JdPQucTjjg

[Edited on 26-6-2017 by symboom]




Natures Intellectual Organic Peroxide. >>Ascaridole <<

Oxone
Used for the production of --> CH2O/Cl2/ClO2/Br2/I2

------------------------------------->>Hydrogen Peroxide << -------------------------------------------- >> Acetylene <<
Peroxide Salts
Zinc Peroxide <\> Copper Peroxide <\>Silver Peroxide <\>Lithium Peroxide <\>Magnesium Peroxide <\>Calcium Peroxide to Calcium Superoxide
CoO2. \\ NiO2 \\ Ti/V/Cr peroxy complex \\ Triamine chromium peroxide \\ LiH \\SiO2-H2SO4 (SSA) \\ [Ni(NH3)6]

Exotic reducing agents
Ga2O TiCl2 GeCl2 && Na2S2O4
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[*] posted on 5-7-2017 at 17:17


So from what I can gather he heats KOH strongly to get rid of some water then adds Al powder and finally distilled off the K metal? I know it is possible to make Cs metal via distillation with CsCl and Ca metal, do you think the same is possible to make K using KCl and Ca metal in a high temp distillation? Has anyone tried this. I got the idea after watching a Cody's lab video where he attempted making K but only got NaK due to using sodium metal in the prep. He tried with Mg metal but got no yield.
So maybe Ca metal will work. Any thoughts?




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[*] posted on 13-7-2017 at 12:23


Quote: Originally posted by symboom  
I wish I knew russian tgere so much I miss just because the some videos are in another language


I know Russian and can translate the video. The author of the video blocked adding translated subtitles to his video, but I'll write the transcript here.

0.00 - 0.11
Hello everyone, you are watching FireTV and today we'll make one of the most active metals, potassium. By the way, you can also make sodium this way, the technology is exactly the same.
0.12 - 0.20
I've tried to make this metal at home many times, and at last I was successful. Let's start with the technology.
0.21 - 0.37
To make potassium, you need potassium hydroxide. To make sodium, you need sodium hydroxide, respectively. By the way, drain cleaner (referring to the most common Russian brand, KROT) is essentially sodium hydroxide, and someday I'll try to make sodium from it. If you melt alkali and add aluminium to it, we'll get aluminate, hydrogen gas and alkali metal we want.
0.38 - 1.07
If you heat the mixture well enough, the metal will start to evaporate, and ultimately condense in a colder spot. The schematic design of the apparatus is very simple, it has an iron retort and a tube. But in reality, it is hard to make this work right. The mixture has to be heated to a very high temperature, and the potassium or sodium vapors condense very fast, so the tube has to be short and quite wide. to ensure that the metal drops flow down it easily.
1.08 - 1.47
Basically, you have a lot of conditions to meet. First, I tried these cylinders from pneumatic crackers, but failed. Most likely, the tube was too long. So I decided to use a smaller cylinder used in air guns. You have to drill the entry hole of the cylinder as wide as you can. I did this in several stages using several drill bits, until I had a 6 mm diameter aperture. One needs to connect a tube to this cylinder; I happen to have copper tubing of 6 mm outer diameter. It fits snugly in the aperture, and no additional sealing is needed.
1.48 - 2.25
I don't have any tools to bend copper tubing, so I have to improvise. A polypropylene part will help me bend the tube without breaking it. I attach one end of the tube and use the cylinder as leverage. It doesn't look very nice, but still better than using pliers. Now I have to cut the pipe in a way to make the bend as close to the cylinder neck as possible. It is very important. I use a sharpie to mark the depth of the cylinder neck aperture on the tubing. After cutting, one needs to smoothen the edges of the pipe using a file and a drill bit for the inside part.
2.26 - 2.46
Everything fits, but I'm just trying it together, and do not force the pipe deep into the cylinder neck. Now I take 10 grams of alkali. Well, well, it's goggle time! Alkali isn't a thing to be trifled with! Once you lose an eye, you can't get yourself a replacement. One has to grind the alkali, to make it more convenient to put it inside the cylinder.

2.47 - 3.09
I grind it in a plastic bag using a plastic pipe to crush the pieces. I don't have a funnel that little, so I'll make a paper one. You have to push ground alkali down there, it becomes moist and sticky amazingly fast. Alkali is very hygroscopic, so we'll have to dry it real hot first.

3.10-4.12
You need an oven to heat it well enough. I'll be using this tin can oven you may have already seen in the release about melting aluminium and alloying it with magnesium. If you want to see that release, see the link in the description. To attach the cylinder inside the oven, I'll drill a 7 mm aperture in the oven and insert the cylinder neck there, for it to sit sloped there. I'll use my favourite Chinese gas torch for heating, this torch can be bought really cheap on Aliexpress and save some money with (some stoopid Aliexpress service advertisement which lasts until 4.12).

4.13-4.28
You have to be careful when heating that cylinder. The alkali inside really bubbles and boils. It has a lot of water, and you can see how much steam exits the cylinder. The steam is corrosive, so open all windows. Wow, this burst is just like back in the days of high school chemistry lessons!

4.29-5.05
When the steam stops, turn off heating and wait until the oven cools down. While it cools, I'll weigh some aluminium powder. I'll use three and a half grams, accuracy isn't very important here, just make sure to stick to the approximate proportion. I'll put the powder inside; while the alkali is still hot, it doesn't exhibit much hygroscopy. It's already solid, so the reaction does not start so far. Very convenient. Now we attach the copper pipe. The cylinder is hot so I'm wearing thick gloves. I put it back into the oven.

5.06-5.50
I put a test tube on the receiving end of the copper nose and prop up the test tube with a chunk of wood. Let's burn the torch now. I'm using small intensity fire, to reach the melting point slowly. Otherwise it can burst even more vigorously than before. As I heat the cylinder, more steam condenses on the walls of the test tube. It means the alkali wasn't dry enough. I'll remove the test tube for a time, I don't want my potassium to get into a wet container. Five minutes later I replace the test tube, and now we can crank the fire up!

5.51-6.24
We still see some white mist on the walls of the test tube. Looks like it's some potassium vapors that oxidize in air and condense as potassium peroxides. Ah, the first drop! Molten potassium starts to drip from the copper tubing, we can see its metallic glitter! Potassium does not catch fire because hydrogen exits the copper pipe as well and creates some inert atmosphere. When the potassium stops emerging, I turn the torch off and remove the test tube.

6.25- 7.06
Pay attention to the burning potassium bits on the copper tubing! I close the test tube with a glove to prevent the main yield from catching fire as well and hold it shut until it's cool. When the test tube cools, I pour some gasoline inside, gasoline prevents potassium from being attacked by air. Because of potassium peroxide traces, the gasoline becomes yellow. Maybe it becomes yellow for some other reason, I don't know. Maybe the gasoline itself is foul. Now I use a plastic spoon to remove the pieces of potassium stuck to the glass. Look how soft it is, even plastic is enough to scratch it off! I'll pour the yellow gasoline off and replace it with paraffin oil.

7.07-7-39
That's how pieces of potassium look now. I want to try to melt it, because potassium melts at 64 C. Let's boil some water, and put the test tube with potassium into this hot water. Once the paraffin oil is warm enough, potassium melts and becomes mercury-like, you can use a plastic stick to break the big drop into smaller ones.

The remaining part of the video is experimentation with potassium.




Smells like ammonia....
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ave369
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[*] posted on 17-7-2017 at 22:27


No one even says "Thank you, ave369"...



Smells like ammonia....
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[*] posted on 17-7-2017 at 22:40


Lol I would like to say thank you. Not because I was prompted but because this is the first time I have read your translation. Great job. I wonder though if there's a better way to remove the water without sputtering molten KOH all over the place. I will be giving this method a try in the near future I think.



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[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 00:59


you are welcome!



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[*] posted on 18-7-2017 at 07:49


You put alot of effort in to translation and times.
I did not see the reply until now Thank You.
I suprised aluminum is being used

And for the calcium it is more reactive on the reactivity series I thought the magnesium should work too although magnesium can be used to isolate sodium but it has to be the hydroxide.
lithium is used for this and calcium. thermodynamic speaking lithium cant reduce calcium oxide. So with that I presume calcium to be a more powerful reducing agent able to produce potassium.

[Edited on 18-7-2017 by symboom]
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[*] posted on 23-7-2017 at 22:10


A video showing magnesium potassium aggregate
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qxS9uKvHWks
And making potassium from magnesium and potassium hydroxide he does a lot of high temperature chemistry
mermaidkiller youtube user name

It is interesting cody tried magnesium with potassium chloride and it did not work
It seems like metals from the alkaline metal group can react with a alkali hydroxide at reduce it to the metal
But a alkali metal can react with a alkali halide to obtain the metal metals calcium to barium might beable to form any alkali metal

Although im not sure if its always true but it seems like the trend that is occurring

[Edited on 24-7-2017 by symboom]

[Edited on 24-7-2017 by symboom]
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