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Author: Subject: Breaking fluorine-carbon bonds
symboom
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[*] posted on 10-12-2019 at 12:13
Breaking fluorine-carbon bonds


Watched a video on how lithium can break sulfur hexafluoride
Into lithium sulfide and lithium fluoride

And I know fluorine carbon interaction is the strongest known bond but can lithium break up 1,1-difluoroethane used as canned air and R134a refrigerant for cars

[Edited on 10-12-2019 by symboom]




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[*] posted on 11-12-2019 at 10:50


never heard of magnesium/teflon thermite?




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[*] posted on 11-12-2019 at 12:19


I did not think it merited its own thread but as long as this one exists i would love to know some milder methods to replace the Fluorine-Carbon bond with a Oxygen-Carbon one for an idea i have been trying to refine.

The ones i know of now is alkali hydroxides and ballmilling with Calcium Oxide
Alkali oxides should work too right?
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[*] posted on 11-12-2019 at 13:28


I suspect that a mixture of steam and R134a passed over something like CaO at red heat would react to give CaF2 and a mess of volatile organics.

However, one reaction you can definitely get from R134a and hot air is the production of HF and or COF2 (the fluoro analogue of phosgene).
So be very careful.
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MrHomeScientist
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[*] posted on 13-12-2019 at 07:03


symboom, link the video!

That's one of the two uses for SF6 I know of (the other being an insulating gas for power boxes). I read about it as a propulsion method for torpedoes - the Stored Chemical Energy Propulsion System (SCEPS).
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symboom
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[*] posted on 13-12-2019 at 10:12


It is the chemical force channel
Sulfur hexafluoride reactions
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TNreVYIyWCE&t=549s
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draculic acid69
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[*] posted on 13-12-2019 at 15:54


Quote: Originally posted by unionised  
I suspect that a mixture of steam and R134a passed over something like CaO at red heat would react to give CaF2 and a mess of volatile organics.

However, one reaction you can definitely get from R134a and hot air is the production of HF and or COF2 (the fluoro analogue of phosgene).
So be very careful.


Sounds like a recipe for death
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