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Author: Subject: Substitute high boiling point solvent
exciton
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[*] posted on 31-8-2011 at 15:46
Substitute high boiling point solvent


The literature says to use trichlorobenzene and bring the temperature to over 200*C and then filter and wash the product with benzene. Since TCB is a hazardous material, I'd like to use a different (cheap?) aprotic non-polar solvent with a similar boiling point. Any suggestions?

Thanks!
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not_important
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[*] posted on 1-9-2011 at 06:36


Depends on the reactants different solvents may or may not be compatible with the reagents and products.

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Nicodem
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1-9-2011 at 07:50
exciton
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[*] posted on 1-9-2011 at 09:24


Reagents are: pyromellitic dianhydride and urea. The product will be poly-phthalocyanine.

Any suggestions?

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exciton
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[*] posted on 6-9-2011 at 19:40


Okay, so I figured out that the _test tube_ containing pyromellitic dianhydride and urea is placed in a high boiling point solvent (such as dipropylene glycol) but the contents _in_ the test tube are not solvated by them. In other words, if I understand this correctly, the reactants remain dry.

I'll eventually give it a try. I'm excited to see if I can produce a cheap organic polymer solar cell from a poly-phthalocyanine dye precursor. :)
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[*] posted on 7-9-2011 at 04:25


Then you're just using the trichlorobenzene as a heating bath?

For 200*C, I think I would switch to a sand bath. That's a little high for the mineral oil baths I would otherwise suggest, and high-temp silicon oil is pretty pricey.
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[*] posted on 7-9-2011 at 05:36


You could try diphenyl ether; widely used for ring closures, decarboxylations, etc.
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