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Ramium
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[*] posted on 27-7-2016 at 00:15


@PHILOU Zrealone and Draconic acid

thanks for the responses. In the end I tried using acetone to force the complex out of solution. When I adding the acetone to the solution containing the complex, a blue precipitate formed. This substance seems to be insoluble in water but forms a fine suspension which looks like a solution.

I guess this can't be the complex then. Probably just copper hydroxide:mad:




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[*] posted on 27-7-2016 at 04:19


Quote: Originally posted by Ramium  
@PHILOU Zrealone and Draconic acid

thanks for the responses. In the end I tried using acetone to force the complex out of solution. When I adding the acetone to the solution containing the complex, a blue precipitate formed. This substance seems to be insoluble in water but forms a fine suspension which looks like a solution.

I guess this can't be the complex then. Probably just copper hydroxide:mad:


From memory: the complex is soluble in methanol (my observation). It can be prepared in dry methanol in which sodium and glycerol are soluble. Presumable the powder is obtain by evaporation of the methanol. I don't know if the sodium hydroxide is required in excess. Probably less so in methanol than in water.
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PHILOU Zrealone
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[*] posted on 27-7-2016 at 05:26


Quote: Originally posted by Ramium  
@PHILOU Zrealone and Draconic acid

thanks for the responses. In the end I tried using acetone to force the complex out of solution. When I adding the acetone to the solution containing the complex, a blue precipitate formed. This substance seems to be insoluble in water but forms a fine suspension which looks like a solution.

I guess this can't be the complex then. Probably just copper hydroxide:mad:

Instead of diethylether/ethanol, you may try plain isopropanol.

I don't understand why aceton would drop Cu(OH)2 from the glycerol complex...maybe aceton interacts a lot with glycerol.




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[*] posted on 27-7-2016 at 23:16
Ethyl nitrate


I'm planning to make some ethyl nitrate soon using the method described here
http://www.prepchem.com/synthesis-of-ethyl-nitrate/

The ethyl nitrate is distilled out of the mixture. As a precuation, the nitric acid used is first boiled with urea to remove nitrous oxide.

But to me distilling ethyl nitrate still seems like a very risky thing to do.

Do I have reason to be concerned?

If I treat all nitric acid, with urea as described in the procedure, Will there still be a risk of an explosion?

Thanks in advance




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smartgene
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[*] posted on 1-8-2016 at 09:37
Is electroysis the only way to make chlorine


I was wondering is there another way to make chlorine from sodium chloride using a oxidant agent or something that is mild without using hcl or any acid

[Edited on 1-8-2016 by smartgene]

[Edited on 1-8-2016 by smartgene]
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[*] posted on 1-8-2016 at 09:40


Potassium permanganate will work.



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[*] posted on 2-8-2016 at 09:35


Quote: Originally posted by DraconicAcid  
Potassium permanganate will work.

Even without acid as requested?

I know KMnO4 and MnO2 works with HCl or with NaCl and an acid...but the question is about a way to make Cl2 without HCl / an acid.




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[*] posted on 2-8-2016 at 18:27


will peracetic acid work
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[*] posted on 3-8-2016 at 15:29


Can other metals their oxides be used as a catalyst in the contact process?
(At lower speed/efficiency)
Some sites mention "a metal oxide" catalyst to be used.
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[*] posted on 7-8-2016 at 00:20


I recently obtained a rather large amount of sodium hypophosphite monohydrate. Does anyone know of any interesting reactions I can do with this?

So far, I have:
- it can be used to dehydroxylate alcohols to the corresponding alkanes
- it can be used to reduce diazonium compounds to the unsubstituted derivatives
- with a radical initiator, it can be used to prepare phosphinic acids from alkenes
- it is a useful hydrogen source for transfer hydrogenations
- it has some interesting chemistry with copper salts (forming copper hydride among other things)

These are all very useful and interesting reactions, but my primary reason for purchasing it was as a source of reducing phosphorus which could substitute for red phosphorus. In addition to uses for hypophosphite itself, is anyone aware of a conversion from hypophosphite salts to phosphorus or, say, phosphorus halides?

[Edited on 7-8-2016 by Cryolite.]
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[*] posted on 7-8-2016 at 10:20


Lead nitrato hypophosphite complex is a sensitive primary explosive :D;):P:):cool:

US Patent nr 2327867




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[*] posted on 8-8-2016 at 19:37
Filtering Tinctures - does it remove any active compounds?


I was wondering if tinctures of things like mint, black walnut, raspberry leaves, garlic, etc made with alcohol would have any active ingredients removed by running through a .45 or 1 micron filter?
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[*] posted on 9-8-2016 at 14:12


Quote: Originally posted by RogueRose  
I was wondering if tinctures of things like mint, black walnut, raspberry leaves, garlic, etc made with alcohol would have any active ingredients removed by running through a .45 or 1 micron filter?

Most usual monomeric organic molecules are into the range of the nanometer...
To give you an idea H2O and N2 are about 1/3 of nanometer.
A nanometer is 10-9 m so about 1/1000 of micrometer what is 10-6 m
So even with a 0.45µm filter you are stil 450 times larger in diameter than a nanometer.
Only very large molecules/3D polymers would be stopped by it except if there is a very big affinity for the matterial of your filter and one of the consituents of the filtrate.




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[*] posted on 13-8-2016 at 18:16
velocity of decomposition


I have been reviewing a publication named:

THE DECOMPOSITION OF CITRIC ACID BY SULFURIC ACID
BY EDWIN 0 . WIIG
RECEIVED\ AUGUST 11, 1930 PUBLISHED DECEMBER 18 , 1930

In the article, the author refers to the "velocity of decomposition", which is manipulated by using 4 different strengths of H2SO4.

He holds the temperature and pressure steady, and measures the amount of time that it takes for carbon monoxide to be produced.

I've not seen this measure in any other literature. Is it an outdated or unused measure?

I'm interested in the effects of the different strengths of H2SO4 on yield.

Thanks ahead,
shad





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[*] posted on 14-8-2016 at 00:21


Perhaps the whole thing is a matter of etymology. Noticing that your cited publication was from the 1930's it very well could have meant velocity in a slightly different context than the current and precise definition we have arrived at since then. Looking at Websters 1828 dictionary we see that velocity has two entries. The first being a general relation to rapidity and swiftness and the second which is philosophically (not yet scientifically) affection of motion by which a body moves over a certain space in a certain time. Both of these definitions make me think that perhaps velocity was not so much then about the speed of a certain object of study but rather more related to the rate or speed at which things go.

Today the difference between speed (a rate regardless of direction) and velocity (as a vector quantity) is direction awareness. Perhaps this is our evolved understanding of the term and we suffer from this over complication when reading literature that regarded velocity in a simpler frame.

Much of this is speculation and would be quite cleared up if we could find a dictionary about 100 years newer than my reference but that was the only version I could readily access.
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[*] posted on 15-8-2016 at 06:52


I have dried some ethanol using 3Å molecular sieves, and the ethanol has gotten quite cloudy because of what I assume is sieve dust. Does anyone have any tips on how to remove the cloudiness?

Also this zeolite dust is relatively inert I assume, but are there any reactions in which this dust might cause troubles?

Thanks
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[*] posted on 15-8-2016 at 13:01


Leave the ethanol to sit (over the sieves) for a few days. The dust will settle, and the dry ethanol can then be decanted off.
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[*] posted on 16-8-2016 at 00:57


Quote: Originally posted by gluon47  
But to me distilling ethyl nitrate still seems like a very risky thing to do.

I had a runaway when I attempted to distill methyl nitrate ─ ethyl nitrate is higher boiling, has a lower OB and is markedly less brisant than NGl, EGDN or methyl nitrate!

All things considered, it doesn't have much bang for bucks!

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[*] posted on 16-8-2016 at 04:38


Quote: Originally posted by hissingnoise  
Quote: Originally posted by gluon47  
But to me distilling ethyl nitrate still seems like a very risky thing to do.

I had a runaway when I attempted to distill methyl nitrate ─ ethyl nitrate is higher boiling, has a lower OB and is markedly less brisant than NGl, EGDN or methyl nitrate!

All things considered, it doesn't have much bang for bucks!


Following Rudolf Meyer-Explosives,Ed4- p131:
Ethyl nitrate has a VOD of 5800 m/s and a Lead block test of 420 ccm³/10g for a density of 1.1g/ccm³.
Vapour forms explosives mixtures with air at room temperature (lower explosion limit 3.8% Ethyl Nitrate)

It is stil a sensitive and powerful nitric ester...overheating during distillation is forbidden --> cold distillation or under vaccuum and in minute quantity.
Impact sensitivity must be between 0.2 and 3 Nm based on related nitric esters.




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[*] posted on 16-8-2016 at 19:11
Copper acetate and iron reaction


I made a copper acetate solution and used an iron wire to stir it. As soon as the wire touches the solution a thin layer of a black precipitate formed on the wire.

I left the iron wire on the solution for sometime and some bubbles appeared and the blue copper acetate solution slowly became discolored. I think this was a displacement reaction where the copper precipted out as small particles and iron acetate was formed. This is possible because copper is lower than iron in the reactivity series.

What amaze me the most was that I did not found any records of this reaction online. I want to know if my assumption is correct.

Thanks

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[*] posted on 16-8-2016 at 19:47


Any copper(II) salt will react with iron. You are correct.



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[*] posted on 18-8-2016 at 08:16


Anyone know how to make the fictional gas, NOVA 6? No, but seriously, could it be a real substance? It is described as follows:


Quote:

According to the periodic table, the three basic elements in Nova 6 are Sulfur (S), Rhenium (Re) and Neodymium (Nd).

Nova 6 appears as a dark green gas. Upon inhalation, it causes vomiting, violent coughing, muscle convulsions, bleeding from the eyes, and blackening of the skin (necrosis), followed by an agonizing death within 10–20 seconds of exposure. In the more refined...form, Nova 6 retains its green color, albeit with a slight yellow tint, and has a much more instantaneous effect. Once inhaled, the victim suffers violent coughing, nausea, vomiting, suffocation, bleeding from the eyes, and scaling, burning skin, with death occurring before the body can even hit the ground.[1] This version has a 100% fatality rate,... the gas was tested on infants, causing death within 30 to 40 seconds.


Nova_6_Elements_BO.png - 87kB




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[*] posted on 18-8-2016 at 10:09


Quote: Originally posted by Velzee  
Anyone know how to make the fictional gas, NOVA 6? No, but seriously, could it be a real substance? It is described as follows:


Quote:

According to the periodic table, the three basic elements in Nova 6 are Sulfur (S), Rhenium (Re) and Neodymium (Nd).


There is no metal sulphide that could possibly be a gas under ordinary conditions.




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[*] posted on 18-8-2016 at 11:23


Quote: Originally posted by Velzee  
Anyone know how to make the fictional gas, NOVA 6? No, but seriously, could it be a real substance? It is described as follows:


Quote:

According to the periodic table, the three basic elements in Nova 6 are Sulfur (S), Rhenium (Re) and Neodymium (Nd).

Nova 6 appears as a dark green gas. Upon inhalation, it causes vomiting, violent coughing, muscle convulsions, bleeding from the eyes, and blackening of the skin (necrosis), followed by an agonizing death within 10–20 seconds of exposure. In the more refined...form, Nova 6 retains its green color, albeit with a slight yellow tint, and has a much more instantaneous effect. Once inhaled, the victim suffers violent coughing, nausea, vomiting, suffocation, bleeding from the eyes, and scaling, burning skin, with death occurring before the body can even hit the ground.[1] This version has a 100% fatality rate,... the gas was tested on infants, causing death within 30 to 40 seconds.

Fictional it is fictional it remains...so unreal yes and as such you could do it fictionally by nuclear fusion...and exposition to gamma-rays from a super sun just before passing it through a black hole and distilling it out of a whorm hole with a pinch of Jupiter clouds and ice from Europa...;)

More realistically:
If the solid matter is nanosized, then it could become airbone and remain in suspension thanks to Brownian move of surrounding gas molécules...but on itself not a gas a such.

[Edited on 18-8-2016 by PHILOU Zrealone]




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[*] posted on 20-8-2016 at 01:32


Hmm..could oxalic acid be used to produce nitric acid, or would it just be oxidized as HNO3 is produced?



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