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Author: Subject: Name that rock
blargish
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[*] posted on 24-7-2015 at 12:03


Cool to see this thread back in business! Thought I might as well show off my own malachite/azurite sample :)

IMG_0598.jpg - 2.2MB


Also, here is an interesting rock that I found at an old volcanic plug a couple years ago. I have an idea of what it may be, but I want to see what others think

Volcanic Plug Rock.jpg - 1.6MB Volcanic Plug Rock 2.jpg - 1.5MB




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[*] posted on 24-7-2015 at 15:02


The layers in the bottom left photo are fascinating.

It looks (to me) as if there was a thin tube in a volcano and the molten rock was pushing & melting some other rock stuff up as it went, yet cooled into that form at some point.

Edit:

Or the layered bits are the sedimentary Surface rocks and the lower bit is the last bit of molten volcano rock to buckle it through a small hole/weakness.

[Edited on 24-7-2015 by aga]

[Edited on 24-7-2015 by aga]




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[*] posted on 25-7-2015 at 01:57


nice malachite/azurite. looks like the sort of stuff from chinese mines.
the other specimen looks like chert to me




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[*] posted on 26-7-2015 at 16:24


Yea aga, the white layers and brecciated fragments where what really caught my eye at first.

I believe that the rock is a rheomorphic welded ignimbrite: a rock formed by the deposition of a pyroclastic flow. If I'm correct, the white fragments in it are known as fiamme, which are pumice fragments that were elongated and brecciated due to the overlying hot ash/rocks. The interesting thing for me is that so called "rheomorphic flow" structures can be seen in the rock (notably in the second picture) where the pyroclastic deposit was able to flow in a fluid-like manner.

Diddi, you're right. The malachite/azurite is from china, although I'm uncertain of its exact locality.

[Edited on 27-7-2015 by blargish]




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[*] posted on 26-7-2015 at 19:00


nice volcanic specimen blargish. did you collect it yourself



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[*] posted on 27-7-2015 at 18:37


Yea, I found it a few years back around an old volcanic plug called Giant's Head on Canada's west coast (BC). The whole area is littered with these crazy smooth volcanic bombs which are locally called cannonballs. I'll get a pic of one that I collected if I can find where I put it...




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[*] posted on 27-7-2015 at 23:15


very good. you might have to do some collecting for me :)




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[*] posted on 28-7-2015 at 06:07


heres a pretty pic for you.... crystalline Stibnite (Sb2S3)
this is crushable and dissolves in acids!

Stibnite a (Medium).JPG - 274kB




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[*] posted on 30-7-2015 at 20:42


Wow, that's a solid piece; did you find it yourself? I lack stibnite in my own collection, but it's still one of my favs.

Here's a fragment of one of those volcanic bombs. I believe the black spots are hornblende. It's really smooth; feels almost like it's been machined.

Volcanic Bomb.jpg - 1.4MB

Additionally, here are a couple rocks from a trip to Mt. Vesuvius. The first one is a tephrite (which are found all over the place) and I believe the second to be a leucitite. Both have some nice phenocrysts (augite/leucite in the tephrite, and leucite in the leucitite).

Vesuvius Tephrite.jpg - 1.7MB Vesuvius Leucitite.jpg - 1.6MB




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[*] posted on 30-7-2015 at 21:05


very nice. the stibnite is a purchase. around here there is a lot of massive stibnite, but no xtals :(

not sure that that is a hornblende? the black crystals should be rectangular. yours look spherical?

Hornblende 3 (Medium).JPG - 271kB
local hornblende from Dookie, Victoria, Aust.




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[*] posted on 30-7-2015 at 22:37


A good number of the crystals are bladed and have hexagonal habit as far as I can tell. As for those that don't, I have seen hornblende take on a blocky appearance, in contrast to its classic needly appearance seen in your specimen (really nice btw), similar to pyroxenes in other samples, which can make it very confusing...

Here is just an example from the web; a hornblende porphyritic basalt which appears very similar to my own rock.

Hornblende Basalt Web.jpg - 111kB
source: https://instruct.uwo.ca/earth-sci/200a-001/200lab3.htm

I could be wrong though as I am by no means an expert :P ; it could certainly be pyroxenes or something else. I find it hard to distinguish all the black blocky/rectangular mineral thingies on looks alone. I guess getting a sense of its cleavage would give me an answer, although it would be hard due to the small size of the crystals


[Edited on 31-7-2015 by blargish]




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[*] posted on 31-7-2015 at 03:06


yes, so many of these minerals are both highly variable and part of a spectrum of alterations. I have a number of pieces if that mineral from same location but all quite different.



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[*] posted on 31-7-2015 at 05:14


Although I posted this in a separate thread a while ago, it was never completely identified, so here it goes. This rock has been discovered along with other apparently pure, blobby metal fragments coated in a hard red oxide shell (which led me to think that it is iron, but -whaaaat?!- it is not attracted to magnets!!!).


Agost 018.JPG - 693kBAgost 032.JPG - 686kBAgost 021.JPG - 1.2MB




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[*] posted on 31-7-2015 at 05:38


not all iron bearing rocks are magnetic. these are hard to identify without cutting or magnification. #1 cant say? #2 could be an iron stained limestone consecration? #3 looks like moss/lichen on a stone wall ?



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[*] posted on 23-8-2015 at 03:30


Quote: Originally posted by diddi  
not all iron bearing rocks are magnetic. these are hard to identify without cutting or magnification. #1 cant say? #2 could be an iron stained limestone consecration? #3 looks like moss/lichen on a stone wall ?


#2 is most probably pure metal/metal oxide, due to very high density compared to limestone. By the way, those blobs were found separate from the rock.
#3 is not lichen, also iron
The iron mineral is found along crevices and grooves in the limestone rock, as well as those blobs such as #2.

[Edited on 23-8-2015 by Eddygp]




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[*] posted on 23-8-2015 at 03:33


yeh, they are really hard to work out by pics. sorry.
where are they from

[Edited on 23-8-2015 by diddi]




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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 08:03


I found this "rock" in the middle of some railroad tracks when walking this morning near some bluffs. It's very attracted to a magnet and heavy. I didn't see any slag pictures in Google images that resembled it but the way it formed looks curious. It's very friable so it seems odd that the edges are still in one piece or that it doesn't looked like it could have been knocked around too much if it fell off a train. I didn't see any other pieces like this rock when I looked for more.


001.JPG - 272kB004.JPG - 254kB
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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 11:27


At a guess, i'd say it was iron & lubricant oil that has built up over a long period of time on a train.

Iron & oils form a kind of rubbery material over a long period of time, which might be why some of it remained intact when it fell off.

Break a small piece off and try to set fire to it.




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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 12:01


It didn't smoke or reduce at all when heated with a butane torch - it just glowed after heating for a few seconds. It almost looks like fine iron grit that has fused together somehow while being in a draft or from gravity. A woman I passed on the trail said it looked like a Christmas tree, I think because of the way it looks swept as it was formed.
Trains drop sand under their wheels sometimes to provide traction when starting and I wonder if fine metal particles from the rail could collect or fuse together this way after being abraded off? Or maybe the rock is some sort of ore or scrap slag-like material that just fell off the train but it was right in the middle of the tracks. As you say it seems like something that formed under the train and fell off though but I don't know.
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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 12:33


Brake residues ?

Iron grinding against iron a lot maybe - the heat could fuse the particles, possibly.

I googled 'Train Brake Turd' and there were no relevant results.




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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 13:38


Maybe it's something inbetween a stalagtite and stalagmite, if there's a word for one that forms in the horizontal from iron particle ejecta.
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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 13:49


Aggregate particulate matter or something like that ?



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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 14:16


It looks like iron particles that have been sintered or another thing that comes to mind is some sort of likeness to an electrode growth that grew in solution but that's a long shot.
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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 17:54


I would call this discussion an "igneous intrusion" (even if it flows along near the surface...)
CRBG- look it up




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[*] posted on 7-12-2015 at 21:47


Morgan keep it away from water and never feed it after midnight.




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