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Author: Subject: Rotting Meat - a graphical treatise....
chemoleo
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[*] posted on 18-4-2005 at 19:43
Rotting Meat - a graphical treatise....


Here's a site that describes that in detail.
Shiver.
http://www.stinkymeat.net/

I am not sure whether this should be classified as 'science-madness' but here you go, it can't get any worse! Tsts, and I was being chastised for posting on urea purification from urine!

It's still got some educational value I suppose!


[Edited on 19-4-2005 by chemoleo]




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[*] posted on 18-4-2005 at 21:38


That certainly was an...interesting....read (to say the least).

I don't think I'll look at meat quite the same way again now...
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[*] posted on 18-4-2005 at 21:51


Pitty he lost the fish though! I wanted to see (wihtout experimenting) what fish which is not fresh (i.e. is not being used directly after collecting it from the water) would have looked like after putrefaction. I wondered if glowing bacteria might also be present, spores being all around and such. Well, guess I will try the isolation again in a month or two. Thanks for the link chemoleo, was quite 'informative' :)



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tom haggen
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[*] posted on 18-4-2005 at 22:36


I'll tell you what, try working a garbage route for one summer and read through that webpage and theres a good chance you'll vommit. Atleast I almost did.



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[*] posted on 19-4-2005 at 03:40


Interesting :D I think I'm gonna barf soon though :o



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sparkgap
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[*] posted on 19-4-2005 at 03:47


Well, I can say this is more educational than the thread about the "unfortunate" cat in Whimsy. :D

I never thought one would devote his/her time documenting putrefacation. :P

sparky (^_^)

P.S. Now I have a better idea of what buzzards (like our resident one) deal with. :)




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[*] posted on 20-4-2005 at 12:45


"When I approached the meat, some of them stood on end and waved their little bodies back and forth. I think they were thanking me. " :D



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chemoleo
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[*] posted on 20-4-2005 at 13:09


Yes, the descriptions are sometimes quite witty :)

Re. the hotdogs - it's quite worrying (as this guy correctly observed) that it took 7 days until obvious signs of decay could be seen. If nature takes so long to decay it, how do our poor stomachs fare?
As the guy said, it took him 7 days to prove that 'hot dogs are at least partially made of organic matter after all' :D
That's why I avoid eating that kind of food.

Re. the fish - yah, that would have been interesting. Although I doubt those bacteria would be luminescent ones, they predominatly occur in saline environments (as found on fish skin straight from the sea)




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sad.gif posted on 7-5-2005 at 06:29
rotten meat


What will you do with the rotten meat ?
It`s a pointless ;) thread !

Put the meat in a plastic bag for 2 weeks.
You will producing CH4 and H2S or
bacteria and virus cultures and toxins ;) ?
(botulinus-toxines, occurrence in dity earth
in some parts of the world)

You can cultivating the bacterias with a viscous ;) gelatin mixture, prepared from H2O, gelatin and glucose.

:P
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[*] posted on 16-5-2005 at 02:38


My appetite, what did you do:P...
I'll havo to postpone my lunch with an hour or so...

Anyway, interesting page - it is real mad-science, but really, really disgusting.
I was also worried about the hotdogs, but keep in mind that sausages are made with bugs, so it is in fact already 'rotten' meat, so not to compare with fresh meat..




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[*] posted on 16-5-2005 at 07:45


The meat wasn't buried, and even in a plastic bag, I don't beleive Clostridium Botulinum could survive, as the atmosphere in there wouldn't be suited to anaerobic bacteria.

Taaie, what do you mean by sausages are made with bugs? I like my sausages, but that sounds a little...disturbing, please elaborate on that one would you?

[Edited on 16-5-2005 by Reverend Necroticus Rex]




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[*] posted on 16-5-2005 at 09:59


Well, maybe I was a bit too conclusive with that part of my post, I've searched and found that only some types of sausages are fermented.
Anyway, the info as you requested:
(Info from a further-non relevant article I found)
Quote:

A potential application of microorganisms for denitrification has directed attention to the food-grade organism Staphylococcus carnosus, which has been used for a long time in the production of raw fermented sausages due to its ability to reduce nitrate to nitrite, which is essential for development of the typical red color.


Furthermore, can Pediococcus cerevisiae and Lactobacillus platarum be used as fermenting agent.
Some salami's are also fermented with fungi on top of that, to give the hard casing and extra taste.

See: Here

More facts on bugs: You have around 2kg of pure bacteria in you intestens, in minced meat are around 10<sup>5</sup>/g baceria, in milk this is around 10<sup>4</sup>.
The white stuff on brie is pure the mycelium of fungi, and so is the bleu stuff in roquefort.
Enjoy you dinner :)




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[*] posted on 18-5-2005 at 08:43


Where I'm from, L. plantarum is commonly used for fermented sausages.

So what if cheese has fungal mycelia? Tempeh (an Indonesian dish) is mostly fungal mycelia plus the stuff they grew in. It's quite good, especially when fried with butter. :)

sparky (~_~)




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[*] posted on 19-5-2005 at 08:07


I don't see why everybody is so disgusted bt this? I was just glad to see my food doesn't normally look the way the food in the first experiment did.

I found the minced meat to be the most informative, especially when the green goop turned out to be liquified meat (produced by the digestive action of the maggot secretions). I must say it was nicely written and the photographs were pretty good I guess but I didn't "almost barf" or postpone lunch (in fact I ate my lunch while reading all this). In fact the only time when food left my mouth in the wrong direction was when I had to laugh real hard about the neighbours coming after the stinkymate and the writer :P
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