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[*] posted on 1-3-2015 at 06:49
literature searching


Today I was sitting and thinking about how poor my literature/reference skills are, so I pulled up the ole SM search engine and after a bit of digging I found an excellent post by Nicodem. I have read many of post that contained no references and countless replies from Nicodem reminding the OP that these should be opened in the beginning section only and directing them to read the SM guidelines and you know how many times I clicked on this link? yep, zero. In my own ignorance I thought this was simply a reminder to follow the rules, I had no idea this valuable info was located there.
The point im trying to get at is I feel that this is truly an art, and a lot of inquisitive members like myself would like to become proficient in this art. with that being said, I would suggest that this post have its own topic or stickey, you know something that you cant help but stumble across.
Perhaps maybe someone could even provide an example, kinda show how its done, or maybe even a flow chart thingy.
anyhow just some food for thought there.
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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 01:28


articles and journals with a DOI number are easy to get.But how do you get very old articles.?
like this one-
"Phenylnitromethane has been prepared by the nitration of toluene with dilute nitric acid in a sealed tube."
Konowalow, Ber. 28, 1860 (1895).
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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 13:46


so cureus, how do you flnd articles/ref with DOI numbers, I have no idea how to do this. Do you just use google, guess ill try that.
Also in my original post I was referring to NICODEM'S POST when I suggested it should be a sticky.
cureus have you read his post it is very informative, lots of info In fact I must read it again myself. I think it mentioned DOI numbers. To see his post go to FORUM MATTERS then click on SM GUIDELINES.

[Edited on 3-3-2015 by blankets]
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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 14:21


Quote: Originally posted by CuReUS  
articles and journals with a DOI number are easy to get.But how do you get very old articles.?
like this one-
"Phenylnitromethane has been prepared by the nitration of toluene with dilute nitric acid in a sealed tube."
Konowalow, Ber. 28, 1860 (1895).

I'm not sure what do you mean with the above example. You already have the reference (Ber. 28, 1860), so all you need is to locate the article, which in this case is pretty simple as the entire Berichte journal is available on-line: DOI: 10.1002/cber.189502802138
The old issues of the journal are also available at Gallica, so you do not even need to access the article via illegal services.




…there is a human touch of the cultist “believer” in every theorist that he must struggle against as being unworthy of the scientist. Some of the greatest men of science have publicly repudiated a theory which earlier they hotly defended. In this lies their scientific temper, not in the scientific defense of the theory. - Weston La Barre (Ghost Dance, 1972)

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[*] posted on 3-3-2015 at 14:27


The US Library of Congress has many old documents as well.

Sign up, and you can Echeck out documents at will.

http://catalog.loc.gov/




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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 03:32


thank you very much nicodem.But how did you find out the DOI number.also I didn't know that "Ber" was berichte,I thought it was berlin :D
so can I find all articles on gallica ?
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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 13:16


Quote: Originally posted by CuReUS  
thank you very much nicodem.But how did you find out the DOI number.also I didn't know that "Ber" was berichte,I thought it was berlin :D
so can I find all articles on gallica ?


guidelines.jpg - 29kB




…there is a human touch of the cultist “believer” in every theorist that he must struggle against as being unworthy of the scientist. Some of the greatest men of science have publicly repudiated a theory which earlier they hotly defended. In this lies their scientific temper, not in the scientific defense of the theory. - Weston La Barre (Ghost Dance, 1972)

Read the The ScienceMadness Guidelines!
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[*] posted on 4-3-2015 at 21:11


I was scared but I clicked it anyway

WHEW!




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[*] posted on 12-3-2015 at 23:08


Quote: Originally posted by CuReUS  
also I didn't know that "Ber" was berichte,I thought it was berlin :D


Which is why in the event that you are confronted with an unfamiliar journal abbreviation, one uses services like CASSI, JAs, or the NLM Catalog. In this case, though, Ber. turns up a bit too many results, but the more common abbreviation Chem. Ber. zeroes in on the expected result. The journal abbreviation Ann will likely exhibit similar problematic searching.

Armed with the journal's full name, you can then use Google, or something more specialized like JournalSeek to see the web page of the relevant publisher.

sparky (~_~)




"What's UTFSE? I keep hearing about it, but I can't be arsed to search for the answer..."
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[*] posted on 13-3-2015 at 01:14


thank you sparky,journal seek will help me a lot.also suppose you don't know the journal's name,just google "ber journal" ,and you will get it.
a few days back,I was searching for this journal
Perrot, Compt. rend. 202, 494 (1936).

I went to the journal website,but they are asking for issue number,how do I find that?
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/16310748
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[*] posted on 15-3-2015 at 16:41


For such old issues of Comptes Rendus, you visit Gallica.

sparky (~_~)




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