Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login - Register]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  11    13
Author: Subject: Homemade and Repurposed Lab Gear
Ubya
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 693
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 00:40


if you drill 2 holes on the side, one on top and one on the bottom, you can glue 2 pieces of tubing (or if it's borosilicate you could even try welding two glass tubes) and make a water jacketed beaker




---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
j_sum1
Administrator
********




Posts: 4658
Registered: 4-10-2014
Location: Oz
Member Is Offline

Mood: Metastable, and that's good enough.

[*] posted on 5-11-2018 at 02:14


I think it is borosilicate. It is at least designed to handle the thermal stress of boiling water.
But I break glass easily enough without trying to modify it. I doubt I would make any useful progress with that process.

Anyway, I have seen jacketed beakers as you describe on ebay for not too much. But I think I have more use for a substitute dewar. Who knows. I might even find some applications for the strainer and the screw lid
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Eisenpanzer432
Harmless
*




Posts: 5
Registered: 9-2-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 8-11-2018 at 00:07


My new lattice support, almost finished but in working condition now. The t square for size reference is 48”.

4F93F4BE-148E-4AE1-8CE2-2BC4E3522052.jpeg - 2.4MB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DavidJR
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 668
Registered: 1-1-2018
Location: Scotland
Member Is Offline

Mood: Anxious

[*] posted on 8-11-2018 at 04:21


Very nice! I've been thinking of building something like that. The commercial lab lattice kits with the connectors etc just seem ridiculously overpriced.

Are you planning on attaching it to the wall/work surface?

[Edited on 8-11-2018 by DavidJR]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ubya
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 693
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 29-11-2018 at 03:44


has anyone ever used this kind of quartz tubing (from oven heating elements) as a normal transparent quartz tubing?
like to hold catalysts or as a combustion tube


20181129_123948.jpg - 515kB





---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
andy1988
Hazard to Self
**




Posts: 73
Registered: 11-2-2018
Location: NW Americus ([i]in re[/i] Amerigo Vespucci)
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 03:30
FoodSaver Jar Sealer to extend shelf life of things (vacuum storage in mason jars at ~20-30mbar)


Using water aspirator:
files.php.jpg - 49kB

With mason jars and ~$9 FoodSaver Jar Sealer (perhaps other products exist, but nothing else on shelves in U.S.). Also 5mm OD vinyl tubing, I use next size up & beeswax to fit to aspirator, don't buy the FoodSaver's overpriced tubing as generic tubing fits perfectly... They market it with their $60+ machines as the vacuum source... but I'm guessing aspirator has better vacuum (vapor pressure of cold water).
IMG_4130_.jpg - 38kB IMG_4128_.jpg - 42kB

Will reduce oxidation problems like with FeSO4, and reduce moisture problems with things like potassium iodide (LOUDWOLF brand bottle pictured in mason jar with rice as desiccant) and alginate (pink powder in picture). Extends shelf life of such things!

I buy big 5lb bag of roasted coffee beans and vacuum seal in many jars, keeps the oil from oxidizing (keeps it fresh!). Also I seal many of my "nootropic" powders this way, like trimethylglycine [1][2]. Searching literature/google for "XYZ stability" would help me find if this procedure is useful for the substance in question.

Note: Gasket on mason jar lid seem to have shelf life differing between brands, I have a bunch laying around, hard and soft, the hard ones won't hold vacuum (i.e. if the gasket hardens in a number of years you'll loose vacuum, lid will pop up indicating as such).

Procedure: Put lid in device and device on jar. Blue rubber holds lid up so that air can be sucked out. Blue rubber must touch glass "flange" below threads to seal (may have to push if flange large, or remove bottom plastic ring). If jar has no flange below threads or flange too large, I think you could use wax to temporarily seal threads. Let vacuum for a minute, pull vinyl tubing from device (not device from jar), it'll "pop" as rush of incoming air pushes lid down, pull device off and verify sealed.

EDIT: I suppose you could also do a dry nitrogen purge first (or other appropriate gas if you have) to try to replace all oxygen & moisture before pulling the vacuum.

[Edited on 12-12-2018 by andy1988]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Sulaiman
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2502
Registered: 8-2-2015
Location: Shah Alam, Malaysia
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 04:00


Quote: Originally posted by CobaltChloride  
Through the hole I put a roll made out of sterile compresses.


These fibreglass wicks are excellent. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/8-10mm-Wick-Alcohol-Kerosene-Fibe...
If you use clean alchohol the flame is almost pure blue with virtually no yellow,
useful for doing a flame test to help identify metal ions,
and of course just as a heating source.

For heating of test tubes etc. I now use IKEA tealight candles. about 30W heat output.

P.S. These wicks are also excellent for burning boric acid in methanol for an eerie green flame.

[Edited on 11-12-2018 by Sulaiman]




CAUTION : Hobby Chemist, not Professional or even Amateur
View user's profile View All Posts By User
arkoma
Forum Redneck
*****




Posts: 1074
Registered: 3-2-2014
Location: Ar-Kin-Saw
Member Is Offline

Mood: Amazed

[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 07:45


Quote: Originally posted by Geocachmaster  
I bought a ceramic top hotplate stirrer when I could, but it blew half of this years chem budget.





Much better


Corning PC-351. Fine piece of gear. Bought mine used two years ago for$80US on ebay.




Self aware bag of organic slime..............

Collector of reagents.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Morgan
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1332
Registered: 28-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-12-2018 at 16:51


Quote: Originally posted by Sulaiman  
Quote: Originally posted by CobaltChloride  
Through the hole I put a roll made out of sterile compresses.


These fibreglass wicks are excellent. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/8-10mm-Wick-Alcohol-Kerosene-Fibe...
If you use clean alchohol the flame is almost pure blue with virtually no yellow,
useful for doing a flame test to help identify metal ions,
and of course just as a heating source.

For heating of test tubes etc. I now use IKEA tealight candles. about 30W heat output.

P.S. These wicks are also excellent for burning boric acid in methanol for an eerie green flame.

[Edited on 11-12-2018 by Sulaiman]


I thought this ceramic material would be fun to experiment with as a wick-like capillary pump.
http://www.polywatt.com/CFB/CFB.html
https://www.wired.com/2003/11/the-curiously-strong-pump/
https://www.appliancedesign.com/articles/85600-igniters-burn...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
mayko
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 940
Registered: 17-1-2013
Location: Carrboro, NC
Member Is Offline

Mood: anomalous

[*] posted on 23-12-2018 at 13:49


inexpensive electroporation device based off piezoelectric lighters:

Quote:

ElectroPen: An ultralow-cost piezoelectric electroporator

Electroporation is a basic yet powerful method for delivering small molecules (RNA, DNA, drugs) across cell membranes by application of an electrical field. Due to its vital role, electroporation has wide applicability from genetically engineering cells, to drug- and DNA-based vaccine delivery. Despite its broad applications in biological research, the high cost of electroporators is an obstacle for many budget-conscious laboratories. To address this need, we describe a simple, inexpensive, and hand-held electroporator inspired by a common household piezoelectric gas lighter. The proposed 'ElectroPen' device costs about 20 cents, is portable (13 g), is fabricated on-demand using 3D-printing, and delivers repeatable exponentially decaying pulses of about 2000 V in 5 ms. We provide a proof-of-concept demonstration by genetically transforming plasmids into E. coli strains and show comparable transformation efficiency and cell growth with commercial devices, but at a fraction of the cost. Our results are validated by an independent team across the globe, providing a real-world example of democratizing science through frugal tools. Thus, the simplicity, accessibility, and affordability of our device holds potential for making modern synthetic biology accessible in high-school, community, and field-ecology laboratories.


https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/12/21/448977
https://doi.org/10.1101/448977

Some backstory: this was designed by motivated high schoolers!
https://twitter.com/BhamlaLab/status/1076325049966252033






al-khemie is not a terrorist organization
"Chemicals, chemicals... I need chemicals!" - George Hayduke
"Wubbalubba dub-dub!" - Rick Sanchez
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
hacker
Harmless
*




Posts: 34
Registered: 18-12-2018
Member Is Offline


biggrin.gif posted on 2-1-2019 at 03:01
Housing for Power Controller




regulator.jpg - 510kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
yobbo II
National Hazard
****




Posts: 307
Registered: 28-3-2016
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 5-1-2019 at 07:48


Quote: Originally posted by RogueRose  
SO I had some old 400w sodium or metal halide bulbs and I cut them open with a diamond wheel on the dremel. They cut very nicely on the far end (where it screws in) and is just under 2" diameter making it perfect for a 2" bung/plug.

These might be great boiling flasks/distillation flasks where there may be remains in the bottom that are difficult to impossible to break up. These are borosillicate glass and they are thicker than both beakers and round bottom flasks that I have checked (broken) by about 20-40%. The setup is self explanitory and I'm going to test it down the road and see what the results are. I plan to use glass tubing coming out of the bung leading to a condenser. IDK if there is anything I need to think of before this, but it seems a plausible idea.

The 400w bulbs (Phillips brand & most brands are same size) are 1,4L to 1.5L which is a very nice size and smaller 250w, 175w, 120w, 100w, etc are all freely available from electricians and gives sizes from 220ml up to the 1.5L.

I used a simple hose clamp around the neck with some tape to give it something to hold onto.





How would you know they are borosilicate?

I have cut open one today and intend to fire polish the cut end.
There is a nice alumina? tube to be had inside as well.
Other halide bulbs (longer and have clear glass) have nice thin alumina tubes that are very useful for shielding thermocouples at their ends
Others contain quite a nice looking blob of sodium (I hope to remove some today). The tube inside these bulbs is u in shape, about 10 inches long and could be used for something or other.

Yob
View user's profile View All Posts By User
mayko
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 940
Registered: 17-1-2013
Location: Carrboro, NC
Member Is Offline

Mood: anomalous

[*] posted on 18-1-2019 at 18:09


the poseidon syringe pump system:

Quote:

While open sourcing has become de rigueur in genomics dry labs, wet labs remain beholden to commercial instrument providers that rarely open source hardware or software, and impose draconian restrictions on instrument use and modification. With a view towards joining others who are working to change this state of affairs, we’ve posted a new preprint in which we describe an open source syringe pump and microscope system called poseidon [....] Together, these components can be used to build a Drop-seq rig for under $400, or they can be used piecemeal for a wide variety of tasks.


overview from one of the authors:
https://liorpachter.wordpress.com/2019/01/18/open-sourcing-b...

preprint:
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2019/01/17/521096





al-khemie is not a terrorist organization
"Chemicals, chemicals... I need chemicals!" - George Hayduke
"Wubbalubba dub-dub!" - Rick Sanchez
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Yttrium2
Flammable Solid
****




Posts: 441
Registered: 7-2-2015
Member Is Offline

Mood: Generally snarky?

[*] posted on 19-1-2019 at 11:40


Quote: Originally posted by Plunkett  
I got tired of using a soup can filled with sand as a test tube holder so I made a proper one from a piece of firewood I had laying around.



I admire this. I admire that you took the time to figure out how to make one that looks good. ect

I'm an admirer of...
View user's profile View All Posts By User
markx
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 560
Registered: 7-8-2003
Location: Northern kingdom
Member Is Offline

Mood: Very Jolly

[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 10:51


Made a small power supply with varied output voltage (0,7-40V, 4A), current control function and some measurement panels for voltage, power and current:

DSCF1878.JPG - 1MB DSCF1880.JPG - 961kB

The power supply is made from a standard 12V SMPS coupled with a SEPIC converter. A versatile match that renders a very capable little lab unit for basically a few dollars.

The blue panel meter is truly a disaster regarding the concept of accuracy....was dirt cheap though :D :D
But on the contrary the red "high precision ampmeter" below that is truly great for the money. Perhaps I got lucky, but testing against a verified ampmeter it shows exceptional accuracy.

Coupled with a homebrew H-bridge pulsed plating unit:

DSCF1881.JPG - 1MB DSCF1883.JPG - 996kB

Makes for great fun in the field of small scale electrochemistry related experimentation.




Exact science is a figment of imagination.......
View user's profile View All Posts By User
C6(NO2)5CH2CH(CH3)N(NO2)2
Harmless
*




Posts: 32
Registered: 4-4-2018
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 15:35


This appears to be a mild form of vacuum filtration, done using a vacuum cleaner: https://youtu.be/M8lXPlD4M3Y?t=99

I've had problems using paper filters, where the last few ml of liquid will not even drop out, presumably because the weight of the liquid is too little to overcome surface tension. Since I don't have a "real" vacuum pump, I will totally have to try this.




Put that in your pipe and smoke it!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
arkoma
Forum Redneck
*****




Posts: 1074
Registered: 3-2-2014
Location: Ar-Kin-Saw
Member Is Offline

Mood: Amazed

[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 15:37


I've used a vacuum cleaner to filter before............:cool:



Self aware bag of organic slime..............

Collector of reagents.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Ubya
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 693
Registered: 23-11-2017
Location: Rome-Italy
Member Is Offline

Mood: I'm a maddo scientisto!!!

[*] posted on 29-1-2019 at 17:07


Quote: Originally posted by C6(NO2)5CH2CH(CH3)N(NO2)2  
This appears to be a mild form of vacuum filtration, done using a vacuum cleaner: https://youtu.be/M8lXPlD4M3Y?t=99

I've had problems using paper filters, where the last few ml of liquid will not even drop out, presumably because the weight of the liquid is too little to overcome surface tension. Since I don't have a "real" vacuum pump, I will totally have to try this.


if you are really desperate you could build this https://youtu.be/vaho7JSVS1I

pvc hand vacuum pump





---------------------------------------------------------------------
feel free to correct my grammar, or any mistakes i make
---------------------------------------------------------------------
View user's profile View All Posts By User
markx
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 560
Registered: 7-8-2003
Location: Northern kingdom
Member Is Offline

Mood: Very Jolly

[*] posted on 10-7-2019 at 14:25


On the note of vaccuum filtration aids....I found this double membrane unit on ebay:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Parker-DC12V-D1001-23-01-Brushless-Vacuum-Pump-Diaphragm-Pump-Dual-Head-Air-Pump/263818752821?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&a mp;_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

This is a really good quality and capable gadget for the money. It actually runs on bearings and even has a counterweight attached to the crankshaft assembly. I'm very pleasantly surprised!




IMG_3935.JPG - 885kB IMG_3937.JPG - 779kB IMG_3938.JPG - 675kB


Time to build this into a proper casing and add a speed control circuit:



IMG_3940.JPG - 775kB IMG_3942.JPG - 933kB IMG_3944.JPG - 759kB IMG_3945.JPG - 852kB


All done and the two stages connected in series for vaccuum operation:



IMG_3948.JPG - 1.7MB IMG_3949.JPG - 1.1MB IMG_3934.JPG - 683kB


Due to the sepic converter I added it can now be operated from basically any source of DC voltage in the range of 3-35V. Rpm can be fluently regulated with the pot knob. It runs very smooth and quiet and pulls more than enough vaccuum for filtration operations even at minimum speed.




Exact science is a figment of imagination.......
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  11    13

  Go To Top