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Author: Subject: UO2 looking for ways to react it
urenthesage
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 00:42
UO2 looking for ways to react it


Hey forum! So I have 7 grams of crude, natural uranium dioxide and Im looking for ways to react this to get different uranium compounds. Ive tried HCl and it doesnt do anything at all. Is there any way to get that pesky oxygen off of the uranium so I can do other chemistry with it?
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j_sum1
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Mood: inert even with vigorous stirring.

[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 01:02


I recall a shocking YT video in the thread on bad youtube videos. From memory it clocks in at about post 40-50. I will look it up for you.

I would not emulate the procedure but it may be that the theory is worth a look.
I am sure that someone more knowledgeable will be here to point you in the right direction. But in the meantime, you may as well be entertained / shocked / informed by someone doing uranium chemistry beside the swimming pool.

Edit
Here is the thread and the relevant post. Thanks blogfast.
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=48892&...

[Edited on 4-4-2016 by j_sum1]




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phlogiston
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 01:12



Someone named Carl Willis has a very nice page with some practical uranium chemistry:

https://carlwillis.wordpress.com/2008/02/20/uranium-chemistr...




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Joe Skulan
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 04:16


It will dissolve in nitric acid.
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hyfalcon
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 08:01


Apparently HCl and an oxidizer, bleach, conc. peroxide will work also.
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urenthesage
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 09:52


Quote: Originally posted by j_sum1  
I recall a shocking YT video in the thread on bad youtube videos. From memory it clocks in at about post 40-50. I will look it up for you.

I would not emulate the procedure but it may be that the theory is worth a look.
I am sure that someone more knowledgeable will be here to point you in the right direction. But in the meantime, you may as well be entertained / shocked / informed by someone doing uranium chemistry beside the swimming pool.

Edit


Here is the thread and the relevant post. Thanks blogfast.
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=48892&...

[Edited on 4-4-2016 by j_sum1]



Thanks for that video, I dont think that process will work with what I have though. Someone else here is suggesting nitric acid, I think Ill try that before anything else. Thanks so much for the video, it was informative and the next time I find myself in the US southwest Ill try and get some of that ore.

My UO2 is hard and glassy and came from veins of calcite at a road cut.
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urenthesage
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 09:54


Quote: Originally posted by hyfalcon  
Apparently HCl and an oxidizer, bleach, conc. peroxide will work also.


Its certainly worth a try, Worst case is that it does nothing, best case Ill have uranyl chloride as a building block for more complex arrangements in the future. Thanks.
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hyfalcon
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[*] posted on 4-4-2016 at 18:31


Read the link phlogiston kindly provided. Very interesting chemistry.

Calcite, carbonates. You really need to read phlogiston's link.

[Edited on 5-4-2016 by hyfalcon]
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neptunium
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[*] posted on 5-4-2016 at 06:19


Some rust remover contain HF and oxalic acid. It can also be used to obtain the tetrafluoride which precipitate out as a green solid




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urenthesage
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shocked.gif posted on 17-4-2016 at 10:58




[Edited on 17-4-2016 by urenthesage]
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urenthesage
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smile.gif posted on 17-4-2016 at 11:08


Quote: Originally posted by neptunium  
Some rust remover contain HF and oxalic acid. It can also be used to obtain the tetrafluoride which precipitate out as a green solid


Actually HF is one of the easier acids to make. CaF when treated with 98%H2SO4 releases relatively pure HF. The problem with pure HF is temperature. It has to remain below 19oC or it vopourizes and puts huge stresses on the container it is in. I wasnt really interested in a uranium fluoride as its difficult to do anything with it. I am currently reacting it in a strong solution of NaOH, and its slowly but surely converting to UO2(OH)2. From there Ill see about making organic complexes from the hydroxide.
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[*] posted on 24-6-2016 at 07:37


I know the tread is a bit old, but for the record, in my experience no oxidizer is required to dissolve U metal in hot nitric acid. So the same should be true for UO2.

By the way, for purification the PUREX method could be interesting. Tributylphosphate very selectively complexes U, causing it to leave the water layer. It's the commercial way to recover U and Pu from used fuel. I haven't tried it yet but it seems to be easy and efficient.
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urenthesage
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[*] posted on 4-7-2016 at 10:43


Quote: Originally posted by bur  
I know the tread is a bit old, but for the record, in my experience no oxidizer is required to dissolve U metal in hot nitric acid. So the same should be true for UO2.

By the way, for purification the PUREX method could be interesting. Tributylphosphate very selectively complexes U, causing it to leave the water layer. It's the commercial way to recover U and Pu from used fuel. I haven't tried it yet but it seems to be easy and efficient.



Cold nitric acid (fuming) did the trick, now im just waiting for evaporation to get rid of the water. Thanks for the tip, it worked.
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DDTea
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[*] posted on 27-11-2016 at 14:00


Maybe not what you're going for, but uranyl nitrate has some potential in photochemical transformations of alkanes (!).

Quote:
One aspect of uranium chemistry that has been well-studied, however, is the photochemistry of the uranyl cation (UO22+).[22-24] Studies by multiple groups have revealed that this cation possesses several intriguing characteristics. Notably, a highly oxidizing excited state, [UO2]2+* (+2.6 V vs. SHE, almost equal to the oxidizing power of elemental fluorine![25]), is accessible under blue light (hν 450–495 nm) irradiation. This excited state is sufficiently reactive to abstract hydrogen atoms from unactivated C−H bonds (BDE >100 kcal mol−1) to generate carbon-centered radicals. Furthermore, pioneering studies by Bakac and co-workers showed that this reactivity could be rendered catalytic for aerobic oxidation of alkanes (Figure 2); with some substrates, the quantum yield approaches unity.[26, 27] Despite this promising reactivity and abundance of desirable characteristics, the applications of the uranyl cation in catalysis remain largely underdeveloped.


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anie.201603149/fu...




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