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Author: Subject: Cleaning up aliphatic "naphtha".
argyrium
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[*] posted on 29-5-2017 at 19:31
Cleaning up aliphatic "naphtha".


Hello SciMadness,

I am hoping someone perhaps from the petroleum or related industry might comment on a question at hand.

I was recently gifted with 5 gal. of aliphatic naphtha with appears to have come from old U.S. military stock. The olive drab can is labeled:

NAL
NAPTHA ALIPHATIC
TT-N-95B TYPE 11
6810-00-265-0664

It has a very unpleasent smell that I do not recognize. Can states it is a "TYPE II SHELF LIFE ITEM" and was manufactured in '83...

I am very familiar with the smells of aliphatic solvents as VM&P naphtha, pet. ether, mineral spirits, etc and the common aromatic solvents and have never smelled anything quite like what I have. Reminds me of a “rancid” smell but definitely aliphatic/petroleum like.

Looked at Google and found 6810-00-265-0664 with the following properties (pertinent only).

Techincal Specification:
DISTILLATION EVAPORATION PERCENTAGE: 10.0 MINIMUM INTERMEDIATE AND 50.0 MINIMUM INTERMEDIATE AND 90.0 MINIMUM INTERMEDIATE

DISTILLATION TEMP: 85.0 DEG CELSIUS MAXIMUM INITIAL BOILING POINT AND 102.0 DEG CELSIUS MAXIMUM INTERMEDIATE AND 107.0 DEG CELSIUS MAXIMUM INTERMEDIATE AND 121.0 DEG CELSIUS MAXIMUM INTERMEDIATE AND 143.0 DEG CELSIUS MAXIMUM DRY

DERIVATION: PETROLEUM

NONDEFINITIVE SPEC/STD DATA II TYPE

PHYSICAL FORM LIQUID

SPECIFIC GRAVITY VALUE 0.708 MINIMUM AND 0.768 MAXIMUM


Question: Any suggestions for a “simple” method of eliminating the obnoxious odor - acid/base washes perhaps?
The idea of distilling this much volume is not to my liking for safety and energy reasons.

Thank you for any comments/suggestions.


[Edited on 30-5-2017 by argyrium]
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PirateDocBrown
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[*] posted on 30-5-2017 at 00:43


Try doing a fractional distil of a small amount. Get good numbers for IBP and FBP, and note the fraction that has the strongest odor, and its BP. See if you can't characterize what it is.

You might try seeing if it decolorizes bromine or permanganate.

Or, if you don't really care, consider filtration through activated charcoal.

[Edited on 5/30/17 by PirateDocBrown]
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AvBaeyer
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[*] posted on 30-5-2017 at 02:45


It is possible that after long term storage that some oxidation took place to acidic compounds giving the rancid odor. Try a base wash then follow up with Pirate's suggestions above.

AvB

[Edited on 30-5-2017 by AvBaeyer]
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PirateDocBrown
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[*] posted on 30-5-2017 at 09:07


Yes, it seems likely it's a carboxylic acid. These have much higher BPs than their parent hydrocarbons.
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argyrium
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[*] posted on 30-5-2017 at 09:19


Thank you PirateDocBrown and AvBaeyer. Will try a small fractional distillation in June and report back. I'd not thought of the KMnO4..

Thanks again.
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[*] posted on 30-5-2017 at 14:05
side note :


because I have recently acquired 20 litres of (presumed) kerosene + contaminants,
I've been reading a little on hydrocarbons,
mainly I thought that I should post this before distillation begins:

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_tar
The residue from the distillation of high-temperature coal tar, primarily a complex mixture of three or more membered condensed ring aromatic hydrocarbons, was listed on 28 October 2008 as a substance of very high concern by the European Chemicals Agency.

I guess benzene-like hazards, which we would of course all be preapared for anyway ;)

it just popped into my head, sorry if not strictly relevant.




CAUTION : Hobby Chemist, not Professional or even Amateur
(suffering from separation of me and my chemistry stuff)
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argyrium
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[*] posted on 31-5-2017 at 15:10



Hi Sulaiman,

Thanks, will read up more before proceeding.

Regarding the base/alkaline washings, I assume NaOH??? but at what concentration. Have never done a base or acid wash on a hydrocarbon.

Thanks
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