Lead(II) sulfide

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Lead(II) sulfide
Galena.jpg
Galena, a PbS ore
Names
IUPAC name
Lead(II) sulfide
Other names
Galena
Lead monosulfide
Lead(II) sulphide
Plumbous sulfide
Sulphuret of lead
Properties
PbS
Molar mass 239.30 g/mol
Appearance Black or gray solid
Odor Odorless
Density 7.60 g/cm3 (20 °C)
Melting point 1,118 °C (2,044 °F; 1,391 K)
Boiling point 1,281 °C (2,338 °F; 1,554 K)
Insoluble
Solubility Insoluble in organic solvents
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Thermochemistry
91.3 J/mol
–98.7 kJ/mol
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Lead(II) sulfide is an inorganic compound with the formula PbS.

Properties

Chemical

Lead(II) sulfide can be roasted in air at high temperatures to form lead(II) oxide and sulfur dioxide. Lead oxide can be further reduced with carbon to lead metal.

2 PbS + 3 O2 → 2 PbO + 2 SO2
PbO + C → Pb + CO
2 PbO + C → 2 Pb + CO2

Physical

Lead(II) sulfide is a black solid, insoluble in all solvents.

PbS is a semiconductor and was one of the earliest materials to be used as a semiconductor.

Availability

Lead sulfide is sold by chemical suppliers.

Lead(II) sulfide occurs naturally as the mineral galena.

Preparation

Lead(II) sulfide can be prepared by introducing hydrogen sulfide to a solution of lead(II) acetate.

Pb(CH3COO)2 + H2S → PbS↓ + 2 CH3COOH

Projects

Handling

Safety

Lead(II) sulfide is so insoluble that it is almost nontoxic, but pyrolysis of the material, as in smelting, gives dangerous lead oxide fumes.

Storage

In closed bottles. Galena crystals can be placed in a frame and placed in a place of choice.

Disposal

Lead wastes should be taken to disposal centers.

Gallery

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads