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Author: Subject: Pretty Pictures (1)
Endimion17
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 10:02


Quote: Originally posted by DJF90  
Because it does. Bromine comes from the greek Bromos, which means stench. At least if I remember correctly.


So, the argument is essentially: "It smells bad because it's named after the Greek word for stench."
That's a fallacy. ;)

Bromine does not smell disgusting at all. Irritating, yes. Disgusting and smelly, no. It resemblies other halogens, nitrogen dioxide and ozone, all being strong oxidizers. Of course, with increasing concentration in unit volume of air, it gets more and more irritating, until it becomes agonizing. But it doesn't have a stench.
Smelly things include impure carbon disulphide, hydrogen sulphide, scatol, etc. Bromine isn't smelly and disgusting.

I've never read any remotely solid argument on why did bromine get that incredibly stupid name. Either something's wrong with my olfactory nerve and/or brain, or the one from the guy proposing the name.




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inspector071
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 10:07


So it has a choking odor like chlorine, but not a disgusting stench from something like putrescine?
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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 10:18


Quote: Originally posted by inspector071  
So it has a choking odor like chlorine, but not a disgusting stench from something like putrescine?


It is a bit choking, but not that bad as sulfur-dioxide, nitrosyl-chloride or simply chlorine is much worse.

The odor of bromine is really characteristic, similar a bit to chlorine, but not that "harsh", and completely different from any amine (like pustrescine) but I think the odor of the chemicals is somewhere in an other topic, this is about the pictures(:


120402_012.jpg - 233kB

[Edited on 10-4-2012 by kristofvagyok]




I have a blog where I post my pictures from my work: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/
-Pictures from chemistry, check it out(:

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inspector071
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 10:25


Quite so, and the pictures you have posted are fantastic! I checked out the ones on your tumblr too. Really makes me want to invest in a nice DSLR to take pretty pictures with. For now, my iPhone + microscope will have to suffice.
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 11:42


Quote: Originally posted by Endimion17  
I've never read any remotely solid argument on why did bromine get that incredibly stupid name. Either something's wrong with my olfactory nerve and/or brain, or the one from the guy proposing the name.


Smell can be subjective to a certain extent (although I think everyone will agree that H2S and mercaptans smell abominable). Maybe the scientist who first isolated it had an acute sense of smell...

Stupid things like that happen sometimes. Example: Fahrenheit wanted to base his temperature scale on human body temperature (100F = normal human body temperature), but he probably had a cold that day because normal body temperature is 98F :P

To give another example, we based all our formulas for electricity on the wrong charge. Now we have the conventional/true current ambiguity.




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ItalianChemist
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 13:22


I like very much smell of H2S!
Bromine is like Cl2! I like it because it isn't as stifling as Cl2 smell!
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dann2
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 15:03


Quote: Originally posted by kristofvagyok  

...........
The main problem with the bromine is to pour it out from the bottle and weight it, because of the fumes what comes out from it, smells really bad and causes not so good things. The positive thing is the fume hood helps a lot(:.........

[Edited on 10-4-2012 by kristofvagyok]


When pouring a liquid from a bottle to another container a trick that usually works nicely it to obtain a glass rod and hold it against the opening of the bottle and use it to guide the liquid into the other container. Liquids usually 'jump' to the rod as opposed to dribbling down where you do not want them to dribble.
When pouring Bromine from one bottle to another the glass rod trick will NOT work. The Bromine refused to jump to the rod. In fact it's as if the rod repells the Bromine. A mess when you have no fume hood.
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White Yeti
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 15:54


Quote: Originally posted by dann2  

When pouring Bromine from one bottle to another the glass rod trick will NOT work. The Bromine refused to jump to the rod. In fact it's as if the rod repells the Bromine. A mess when you have no fume hood.


I'm sorry to be brusque, but DUH! Bromine does not adhere to glass the same way as other liquids (polar liquids notably). I haven't worked with bromine or benzene, but I'm willing to bet that benzene will not trickle down a glass rod either because of its polarity, or lack thereof.




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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 10-4-2012 at 18:52


Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  
Thanks! That was my first try, Ive seen that video many times too while trying to figure out the ideal mix. Maybe more concentrated ferroin and/or a catalyst... I didn't add any Ce or Mn, time to tweak the formula! I am going to try with a methyl orange formulation... Hopefully it is as good if not better:)

[Edited on 10-4-2012 by Mailinmypocket]


Tried the Belousov-Zhabotinsky again, this time by adding methyl orange along with ferroin to the mixture. The waves were much more pronounced and more frequent and organized. The first time the petri dish more or less went through a rapid color change, this time it was a slow creeping wave formation that repeated itself every 15 seconds or so.

This is a fun reaction to do and try modifying the concentrations on different reagent and time/monitor the effect of the changes.

This is the latest try with methyl orange:



bz2.JPG - 142kB

[Edited on 11-4-2012 by Mailinmypocket]

bz3.JPG - 141kB
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RonPaul2012
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[*] posted on 11-4-2012 at 05:33


I have wanted to contribute to this forum in some way for quite some time.

Here are some pictures I took of a flaming boric acid denatured ethanol mix.

Enjoy :D



green flame.JPG - 115kBgreen flame 2.JPG - 94kB
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kristofvagyok
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[*] posted on 11-4-2012 at 12:13


Quote: Originally posted by RonPaul2012  
Here are some pictures I took of a flaming boric acid denatured ethanol mix.

Enjoy :D


When I made the same experiment and the ethanol was with high excess (95% EtOH and just 5% MeOH) the flame was mainly yellow and had just a slight green tint, just with pure MeOH was a really green flame produced. But these results are fantastic! Congrats!


Quote: Originally posted by White Yeti  

I'm sorry to be brusque, but DUH! Bromine does not adhere to glass the same way as other liquids (polar liquids notably). I haven't worked with bromine or benzene, but I'm willing to bet that benzene will not trickle down a glass rod either because of its polarity, or lack thereof.


Today I tried our with some benzene and it didn't "tricked" down the glass rod. And I won't try it our with bromine, ok?:D


120411_117.jpg - 290kB




I have a blog where I post my pictures from my work: http://labphoto.tumblr.com/
-Pictures from chemistry, check it out(:

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ItalianChemist
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[*] posted on 11-4-2012 at 12:46


Hi!
I've made this nice compound mixing FeCl2, 2,2'-Bipyridine and NaBF4
I think that this is Fe[bipy]3(BF4)2, but I'm not sure


DSC02481 copia.JPG - 110kB
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Mailinmypocket
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[*] posted on 11-4-2012 at 15:24


Quote: Originally posted by ItalianChemist  
Hi!
I've made this nice compound mixing FeCl2, 2,2'-Bipyridine and NaBF4
I think that this is Fe[bipy]3(BF4)2, but I'm not sure




Nice job! It's so satisfying to see big crystals in the bottom of your vessel/filter paper etc! I'm not certain of what compound you made either but it looks cool ;)
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RonPaul2012
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[*] posted on 11-4-2012 at 15:52


Quote: Originally posted by kristofvagyok  
Quote: Originally posted by RonPaul2012  
Here are some pictures I took of a flaming boric acid denatured ethanol mix.

Enjoy :D


When I made the same experiment and the ethanol was with high excess (95% EtOH and just 5% MeOH) the flame was mainly yellow and had just a slight green tint, just with pure MeOH was a really green flame produced. But these results are fantastic! Congrats!


Quote: Originally posted by White Yeti  

I'm sorry to be brusque, but DUH! Bromine does not adhere to glass the same way as other liquids (polar liquids notably). I haven't worked with bromine or benzene, but I'm willing to bet that benzene will not trickle down a glass rod either because of its polarity, or lack thereof.


Today I tried our with some benzene and it didn't "tricked" down the glass rod. And I won't try it our with bromine, ok?:D
Thanks , I'm glad you liked it :)
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ItalianChemist
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[*] posted on 12-4-2012 at 02:43


Quote: Originally posted by Mailinmypocket  



Nice job! It's so satisfying to see big crystals in the bottom of your vessel/filter paper etc! I'm not certain of what compound you made either but it looks cool ;)

Thank you!
They aren't very big, in the photo they are enlarged!
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Endimion17
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[*] posted on 12-4-2012 at 03:15


This is not something I've exactly made, but it's a chemical compound nonetheless, and it's pretty.

link to all sizes

It's vanadinite, Pb<sub>5</sub>(VO<sub>4</sub>;)<sub>3</sub>Cl.
Although it does look somewhat edited, it really does look like this in strong sunlight. The back of the crystals have an opaque deposit, so the light is reflected a lot more.




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Squall181
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[*] posted on 12-4-2012 at 07:45


Thanks Endimion that's a beautiful picture and worthy of being my desktop background
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dann2
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[*] posted on 13-4-2012 at 04:32


Quote: Originally posted by White Yet  

I'm sorry to be brusque, but DUH! Bromine does not adhere to glass the same way as other liquids (polar liquids notably). I haven't worked with bromine or benzene, but I'm willing to bet that benzene will not trickle down a glass rod either because of its polarity, or lack thereof.


The 'rod trick' can be very useful when transferring liquids.
Benzene runs down a rod OK.
Perhaps the very dense Br has very high surface tension, like Hg. It's as if the glass rod repells it.
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[*] posted on 13-4-2012 at 12:36


A solution of perylene in acetone fluorescing under UV light on a watch glass, and some acting as a fluorophore in a bottle demonstrating chemisluminescence with TCPO.

Credit to garage chemist for pointing me to a synthesis of perylene starting from 2-naphthol on versuchschemie.de

The chemiluminescence was so intense it could be seen in daylight

IMG_6212.JPG - 19kBIMG_6205.JPG - 8kB
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[*] posted on 13-4-2012 at 12:43


Hey plastics, didn't you want to describe how you made the 2,4,6-trichlorophenol? Doesn't have to be a detailed procedure, just tell me how you did it, and how you determined that the product was the desired substance and whether it was pure.




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[*] posted on 20-4-2012 at 04:43


High purity 99,999%+ Niobium metal crystals :)


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[*] posted on 20-4-2012 at 09:18


Quote: Originally posted by Endimion17  
This is not something I've exactly made, but it's a chemical compound nonetheless, and it's pretty.

link to all sizes

It's vanadinite, Pb<sub>5</sub>(VO<sub>4</sub>;)<sub>3</sub>Cl.
Although it does look somewhat edited, it really does look like this in strong sunlight. The back of the crystals have an opaque deposit, so the light is reflected a lot more.


Looks photoshoped, but great still. :)
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dann2
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[*] posted on 20-4-2012 at 12:48


@Dessik SK

It the Nb you own, did you grow them yourself?
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[*] posted on 20-4-2012 at 13:50


Quote: Originally posted by dann2  
@Dessik SK

It the Nb you own, did you grow them yourself?


Hello.

Yes It's from my collection.

No, It was made in Russia many years ago. I dont think this type of Niobium is made anymore.
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[*] posted on 25-4-2012 at 17:31


Iodine ingot made by melting iodine under concentrated sulfuric acid. Credit goes to woelen for suggesting this.


iodine_ingot.jpg - 87kB

Suspended iodine.


[Edited on 26-4-2012 by barley81]

suspended_iodine.jpg - 62kB
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