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Author: Subject: KClO3 cell continuous production
vanBassum
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[*] posted on 10-9-2019 at 10:03
KClO3 cell continuous production


I have a chlorate cell witch is working like it should. But there is one drawback to this setup. The potassium clorate witch forms at the bottom of the cell gets stuck from time to time. The reason, I think, this happens is because of the lower temperature at the bottom of the cell. So I opted to improve this process.

The idea is to slowly pump the electrolyte to a separate container with a filter in the bottom. Because of the low flow, the temperature in the separate container will be held at ambient temperatures. Therefore the potassium chlorate will precipitate out of solution en be caught in the filter. The filtrate will find its way back to the cell. This way the product can be easily collected from the filter while the process isn't disturbed. Only thing left to do other than collecting product will be to add saturated KCl to the cell whenever needed. (Witch could be automated.) There is one potential problem. The potassium chlorate could crystallize out inside the tubing witch will clog the system. This can be fixed by heating the tubing, but i don't know how practical this will be.

For now I created a small setup like this to test the theory. I've added a peristaltic pump to pump the electrolyte around. The filter consists of an empty soda bottle slightly raised above the cell. Any filtrate can flow back trough a tube to the cell. How well the soda bottle will keep up... Time will tell. It is easily replaced with something else if necessary.

This is running now for a little while now. Ones I have results Ill post them. :)

BTW, I can imagine that a setup like this is not very practical for most hobbyists because I don't know what to do with all this chlorate. It is however quite interesting to mess about with setups like this.







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mysteriusbhoice
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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 21:05


Here is a solution, use pure NaCl as your electrolyte and have a separate tank hooked up via pump where the temperature of the tank is lower and KCl solution is dripped onto the flowing NaClO3 to convert it to KClO3 which would build up at the bottom of the tank and using NaCl electrolyte is overall better for your anode
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mysteriusbhoice
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[*] posted on 11-9-2019 at 21:08


If the second tank has agitation then they won't build up in the walls and can easily be filtered but I would say that this kind of setup is overkill for small scale
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vanBassum
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[*] posted on 10-10-2019 at 08:20


So I tried this...

The idea kind of works but I had a lot of issues with crystals growing in the tubes.
I tried to adjust the speed of the pump, but my pump is not fast enough.
For now the conclusion is that this is more trouble than its worth. I you want a lot of CLO3 just make a bigger cell.
Although this was a bit of a failure, I might try this again in the future.

A much faster pump every ones in a while could suck up the crystals from the bottom of the cell, dumping them in a filter and returning the liquid back into the cell.
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Deathunter88
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[*] posted on 10-10-2019 at 15:50


KClO3 just isn't soluble enough for a continuous cell to work well. As mysteriusbhoice said, use NaCl and then react with KCl afterwards.
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phlogiston
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[*] posted on 11-10-2019 at 00:33


Its a good idea in principle, and not only for the reasons you mention.
Commercial operations in fact alos use large holding tanks, and the main reason is that it allows time for a slow but efficient hypochlorite autooxidation reaction to take place.
The holding tank is kept hot though (IIRC around 70 deg C) to speed up the reaction.
Thanks for posting your attempt, I've thought about trying this many times, but never got around to.




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yobbo II
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[*] posted on 14-10-2019 at 04:57


Some have done it.

The solubility is not a problem. If using sodium chlorate you will have to wait a while before chlorate starts to come out as solid due to its high solubility.

Yob

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