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Author: Subject: what do you use to store iodine/bromine
Hennig Brand
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[*] posted on 29-11-2014 at 09:15


Here is a how I have been storing iodine. Small, 50mL, Erlenmeyer flasks were fitted with homemade Teflon stoppers. Teflon rod was chosen that was at least slightly larger than the inside diameter of the flask neck. The length of rod desired to be inserted into the flask neck was turned down on a lathe so that it was small enough that there was room for a couple of wraps of Teflon plumbers tap between it and the inside of the flask neck. When the stopper was cut from the full piece of rod at least a small section of full diameter rod was left attached to keep the stopper from falling into the flask and to act as a handle. The couple of wraps of soft and elastic Teflon tape used compresses and conforms very well to slight irregularities in the flask neck and Teflon stopper providing a good seal. Electrical tape was added to prevent the stoppers from shifting or coming out in storage. Only a very slight smell of iodine is detected around the stoppers.

I could have done a much neater job of making the stoppers (they were made in only a few minutes).

Iodine Stored In Erlenmeyers With Homemade Teflon Stoppers.jpg - 166kB


[Edited on 30-11-2014 by Hennig Brand]




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quantumcorespacealchemyst
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[*] posted on 12-12-2014 at 03:55


cool. as far as liners, there is teflon sheet i use on ebay for seals and weigh boats. the only trouble is forming a seal around the bottom of corks for me, the side walls can wrap. my idea, others probably before, is if one has a screw top glass bottle, that has a flat top bottom, that a small amount of teflon sheeting, pressed into the cap mostly prior to screwing down helps to seal rather well, say for bromine (eager to do this, and liberate bromine from salts). one thing to watch for is if the piece of sheeting isn't pre pressed before screwing on, and/or screwing the cap on too tight as the edges (of the sheet) weaken/compress and depending on how it is treated may tear around the edges. one may see what i mean by tinkering with it, i believe it works well.

i got the sheeting on ebay for about 6-7USD a sheet (i quoted this incorrectly as a couple bucks a few places previous to this),
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[*] posted on 12-12-2014 at 05:01


Using a flat Teflon seal in a screw top is a good idea and is how a lot of the commercially made chemical storage bottles are made. I have been meaning to try it for a while, but never got around to it or never saw the right container maybe. I think there are a lot of containers, such as screw top or the metal wire/bale bottle clasp type possibly (if made of glass or other suitable material), that could have their rubber or plastic seals replaced with Teflon and be used to store iodine and many other things as well. Most of the common plastics aren't really suitable for storing iodine long term from what I understand.

I looked into it a bit and decided it would be very difficult to cover a rubber or cork stopper with Teflon tape, etc, well enough to make a good seal and prevent chemical vapors from reaching the stopper. I eventually decided solid Teflon bushings were the way to go.




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Benignium
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[*] posted on 1-2-2021 at 17:03


Old thread, I know, but it is mentioned on the wiki page so I decided I'd share my bromine container of choice.



I got this from deschem, on Ebay. The size pictured is 55 mL, but it currently holds 203 grams, which is 65 milliliters, of bromine. Some got on the threads when I last filled it, but nothing gets past the fluoroelastomer o-ring. I've had bromine in it for months now, wet and dry, and it has held up perfectly.


Link to product page on Ebay





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TriiodideFrog
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[*] posted on 2-2-2021 at 01:46


Bromine can be kept in ampoules made out of test tubes or droppers. Just put a small amount of bromine( about half the test ampoule ) and heat the open end until it closes.
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[*] posted on 2-2-2021 at 02:07


I keep bromine in 10ml ampoules.

They have obvious pros:
-easy to fill
-easy to seal
-glass is resistant to bromine

And some cons:
-glass can break (ampoules have not very thick walls, although none of mine broke)
- they have to be discarded when a part of substance is taken, new ampoule have to be filled with remaining part (not necessarily when ampoule was opened gently and can be sealed)

The bottle that Benignium showed seems great. However for the price of one bottle I could get a load of ampoules.

bromine.png - 654kB
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[*] posted on 2-2-2021 at 12:25


The high pressure bottles seem to cost only few $ more for 500mL version compared to 50mL. So, it could be wise considering a larger one, if a need arises.

Test tubes can indeed be very easily be converted into ampoules of any size available. The tubes should first be preformed to have a narrow neck, which a pipette or a needle fits, so the heat required to seal the ampoule will be minimal. This type can be sealed within seconds with small torch, so there will be no risk of heating up the contents. There is also a tutorial for vacuum packaging ampoules - inert gas filling would be easier, though.

If one has any plan of using the reagent, a predetermined amount could be loaded in an ampoule, so a full charge or a multiplier of it is used every time a seal has to be broken, to remove the need for repackaging, especially for small amounts.
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[*] posted on 2-2-2021 at 13:25


Quote: Originally posted by thethule  
Hi guys, i have a nice element collection going, but the 100g of Iodine i put in a screw top jam jar last year has pretty much eroded the metal top and is slowly escaping into the surrounding element "cubicles" (i have removed the others for now). I'm about to buy another 100g (i live in the UK, perfectly legal) and was wondering if you guys had a link to a glass jar i could buy to safely keep it as contained as I can be. It has to be room temp ideally as i have em on display.

Maybe a sealed ampoule would be a better idea? I'm toying with buying some long borosilicate tubes and attempting to make my own. Is that a viable solution? Will the Iodine survive while im heating the top end of the tube to soften and seal it? Is there any chance of the ampoule shattering if the pressure inside gets too high from sublimated iodine?

I did a search btw, but the links to jars on the article i found in this forum are dead.

Thanks for reading

Iodine leaks out of pretty much every bottle, you can greatly decrese the leakage by using a PTFE lined bottle (such as red cap GL45) or just having it entierly closed as with an ampule. Making an ampule isnt hard at all, especially with iodine-.
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[*] posted on 2-2-2021 at 13:41


My iodine is stored wet in a glass bottle with a glass stopper which is wrapped in regular plastic foil, it has been stable sitting around for years without any noticeable change.
Boring but effective.
Only downside is that when I need it I have to get it out of solution.

[Edited on 2-2-2021 by Belowzero]
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draculic acid69
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[*] posted on 3-2-2021 at 03:24


Iodine stores perfectly in a coke bottle.does not leak at all
Bromine will escape from anything except a sealed glass vial.
The ONLY other option is to keep it frozen in a PFA bottle as uc235 does
in his bromine video
Anything else leads to gradual escape of bromine.
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draculic acid69
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[*] posted on 3-2-2021 at 03:28


Quote: Originally posted by Benignium  
Old thread, I know, but it is mentioned on the wiki page so I decided I'd share my bromine container of choice.



I got this from deschem, on Ebay. The size pictured is 55 mL, but it currently holds 203 grams, which is 65 milliliters, of bromine. Some got on the threads when I last filled it, but nothing gets past the fluoroelastomer o-ring. I've had bromine in it for months now, wet and dry, and it has held up perfectly.


Link to product page on Ebay







$40 for the test tube and $1000 for delivery.wtf?
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[*] posted on 3-2-2021 at 04:22


$40 for the tube and $5 for delivery.
I think that $40 for a single tube is quite a lot of money. I make ampoules for stuff like Br2.




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mr_bovinejony
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[*] posted on 3-2-2021 at 04:39


Why has no one mentioned storing bromine under a layer of sulfuric acid and in the freezer? If you don't want to melt glass then this seems like the best way
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clearly_not_atara
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[*] posted on 3-2-2021 at 16:55


For maximum convenience, you can also "store" bromine by making potassium bromate and put it in a $1 jar on the shelf... ok, there's work involved, but there's also work involved in sealing an ampoule!



[Edited on 04-20-1969 by clearly_not_atara]
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draculic acid69
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[*] posted on 4-2-2021 at 02:27


Quote: Originally posted by clearly_not_atara  
For maximum convenience, you can also "store" bromine by making potassium bromate and put it in a $1 jar on the shelf... ok, there's work involved, but there's also work involved in sealing an ampoule!


Sealing an ampoule is a lot less work than going back to square one and reextracting,
distilling and drying all over again
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[*] posted on 4-2-2021 at 02:30


Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
$40 for the tube and $5 for delivery.
I think that $40 for a single tube is quite a lot of money. I make ampoules for stuff like Br2.


It said $999 for delivery when I looked at it
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[*] posted on 4-2-2021 at 02:44


Quote: Originally posted by mr_bovinejony  
Why has no one mentioned storing bromine under a layer of sulfuric acid and in the freezer? If you don't want to melt glass then this seems like the best way


Are you Speaking from experience or guessing here?


[Edited on 4-2-2021 by draculic acid69]
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[*] posted on 4-2-2021 at 06:47


Quote: Originally posted by draculic acid69  

Sealing an ampoule is a lot less work than going back to square one and reextracting,
distilling and drying all over again

Making bromine from (clean) potassium bromate is a lot easier than making it from any OTC precursor. Back to square three, maybe. Just combine with hydrobromic acid (itself not that hard to store) under cooling.

Plus, you can use bromate directly in many procedures where you might otherwise want to use bromine, including e.g. aromatic bromination.




[Edited on 04-20-1969 by clearly_not_atara]
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[*] posted on 6-2-2021 at 04:01


only screw cap line from PBT with PTFE coated silicone seal


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[*] posted on 16-2-2021 at 11:10


I stored my Br2 in glass ampules before, but I think I found a way better solution now. I'm using the "pure premium" caps for the GL45 duran Bottles. They are made out of TFA with a PTFE liner. I put a quantitiy of Br2 in one bottle and stored it outside for a year, so it even got warm in the summer. Now after over a year there isn't even the slightest bit that got out, it still weights the same.
But if you don't find them relatively cheap secondhand they are very expensive, but a better solution to ampules, as you can just take the amount out, that you need.




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[*] posted on 16-2-2021 at 11:14


I have a bottle of iodine that's over 10 years old, opened a couple of times and haven't ever noticed anything noteworthy on it's wellkeeping. I haven't found iodine to be difficult to store, hence.
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[*] posted on 17-2-2021 at 03:34


With Iodine I also don't have any issues at all. Especially since I'm storing it in the freezer.



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[*] posted on 17-2-2021 at 09:29


An ordinary glass reagent jar from the old days with a plain rubber stopper is basically flawless. I've been using the same iodine for 6 years without issue.
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[*] posted on 17-2-2021 at 15:29


Quote: Originally posted by draculic acid69  
Quote: Originally posted by woelen  
$40 for the tube and $5 for delivery.
I think that $40 for a single tube is quite a lot of money. I make ampoules for stuff like Br2.


It said $999 for delivery when I looked at it
You’re in Australia right? That’s Deschem’s way of saying that they aren’t allowed to ship to Australia anymore.

Those pressure tubes are nice though. I’ve used them for running high pressure reactions, some of which contained some pretty nasty stuff under pressure, and they still held up perfectly. The key is that you use a good quality o-ring, like Viton, and replace it if it ever starts getting crispy. The lids themselves are solid PTFE: not gonna be touched by anything.

Edit: but to be clear, I think they’re overkill for bromine. Bromine is fine in a regular media bottle in the freezer. Keep it frozen when you aren’t using it and you won’t have problems. I would be more inclined to use a pressure tube to store reagents that are both corrosive and water sensitive, since storing water sensitive stuff in the freezer can get messy due to condensation.

[Edited on 2-17-2021 by Texium (zts16)]




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draculic acid69
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[*] posted on 18-2-2021 at 01:04


If they just say we no longer ship to Australia it's a lot easier than trying to decode
such a ridiculous delivery price. have any other Australians seen this with deschem? Is it just this product or all glassware? And since when
have they cared whether or not there "allowed"
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