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Author: Subject: Ika or Corning?
teodor
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[*] posted on 30-12-2020 at 11:57


@valeg96
This refined oil of alkanes is still flammable and can ignite on some conditions. If you check the information about flash/autoignition temperature of alkanes after C10 you will be surprised that it doesn't go up with increasing number of carbons. And for many of them it is unknown. Various sources say "it can ignite only in gaseous phase". That's why I am personally more comfortable with a mantle. If it would ignite I could at least know what exactly is wrong. I just like to control as many parameters as I can.
Not uniform on the glass ... hm. If I run it several time on the same glassware and everything is OK I can predict it will be OK next time especially if the temperature is lower than the previous time. I always check my glassware with extreme heating before any serious usage. So, I didn't get any evidence that the heating with hot air stream is not so uniform to break something for round bottom and pear shaped flasks made from Duran glass in the range up to 380C. Well, I didn't try vacuum yet. But you are right, it is better to make some shape or compartment which spreads the stream like a real air bath. I very like the idea I saw in this video from Laboratory of Liptakov. But I have no idea which material he used.

[Edited on 30-12-2020 by teodor]
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valeg96
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[*] posted on 30-12-2020 at 12:04


Looks like a cheap-ass rip off of an IKA C-MAG HS, I like it. It's probably an IKA hotplate produced by Corning under some kind of license*, with the same pieces and just a cheaper look. It looks like a good choice.

The general rule of thumb is: the slimmer and overly digital it is, the less durable it is, and the more expensive spare parts will be.

*I've seen plenty of those models by different manifacturers, but different looks.





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[*] posted on 30-12-2020 at 17:34


Quote: Originally posted by valeg96  
Looks like a cheap-ass rip off of an IKA C-MAG HS, I like it. It's probably an IKA hotplate produced by Corning under some kind of license*, with the same pieces and just a cheaper look. It looks like a good choice.

The general rule of thumb is: the slimmer and overly digital it is, the less durable it is, and the more expensive spare parts will be.

*I've seen plenty of those models by different manifacturers, but different looks.


Excellent! Upon excitedly inquiring for a CMAG HS 7 I noticed that the biggest selling point was its' digital capabilities. However, I possess a digital laser thermometer therefore don't require this feature to be built in especially if it means higher chances of failing in the future. Don't mean to sound cheeky but have u owned a cmag hs for laboratory use? thank you in advance

s-l1600 (1).jpg - 143kB

[Edited on 31-12-2020 by SoundClown]
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valeg96
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[*] posted on 31-12-2020 at 01:48


Personally owned, no, but used, yes. Aside from an IKA RCT B, which I never use, everything else I have is 20+ years old. And a design flaw just came to mind, glad you asked that!

Those two knobs on the IKA C MAG are very loose, and do not have a start or intermediate clicks, so they rotate freely. I assume it is to provide a fine temperature control, but... it happened a couple times in our lab that while working near one of them a brush of your hand on the knobs while moving something in was enough to rotate the handles and raise the temperature of the hotplate by 50+ degrees, screwing up the reaction.

It's something very minor, but with that Corning there is zero chance of it happening.

[Edited on 31-12-2020 by valeg96]





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[*] posted on 31-12-2020 at 03:01


Quote: Originally posted by valeg96  
Personally owned, no, but used, yes. Aside from an IKA RCT B, which I never use, everything else I have is 20+ years old. And a design flaw just came to mind, glad you asked that!

Those two knobs on the IKA C MAG are very loose, and do not have a start or intermediate clicks, so they rotate freely. I assume it is to provide a fine temperature control, but... it happened a couple times in our lab that while working near one of them a brush of your hand on the knobs while moving something in was enough to rotate the handles and raise the temperature of the hotplate by 50+ degrees, screwing up the reaction.

It's something very minor, but with that Corning there is zero chance of it happening.

[Edited on 31-12-2020 by valeg96]



Thank you for such a detailed response, very grateful for clear comparisons from an individual more experienced than myself
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