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Author: Subject: Ti substrate ThO2 anode for perchlorate cell. Good idea?
itsallgoodjames
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[*] posted on 15-1-2021 at 23:11
Ti substrate ThO2 anode for perchlorate cell. Good idea?


This is a thought that I came up with at two in the morning, so sorry it if it's completely absurd. I was thinking that one might be able to use a ThO2 anode in a perchlorate cell.

One could take a titanium electrode, coat it in Th(NO3)4, and thermally decompose it into ThO2. Now the question is, would the electrode be any good? I'm thinking that they likely would, as ThO2 is quite chemically resistant, and would likely be resistant in a perchlorate cell. The other question is as to whether or not they would actually make perchlorates. I have no clue how I would predict this ahead of time, so if someone could educate me as to that, it'd be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

edit - My greatest concern with this is small amounts of the ThO2 coming off the electrode and getting stuck in the perchlorate, as Th is radioactive.

[Edited on 16-1-2021 by itsallgoodjames]




Nuclear physics is neat. It's a shame it's so regulated...

Now that I think about it, that's probably a good thing. Still annoying though.
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Fyndium
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[*] posted on 16-1-2021 at 02:29


First came in mind the TIG tungsten thorium alloy rods. They are being phased out, though, and are very small for electrolysis.

There will always be small contaminations of all that it put in contact with the solution. The amounts may be insignificant, in order of parts per billion, or so, though, and anything that does not dissolve, is usually readily filtered out. For example carbon rods corrode, but I haven't found filtering the solution an issue.
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Jome
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[*] posted on 16-1-2021 at 07:09


Two questions need answers:

First and foremost, what is the conductivity of ThO2?

If you look at a pourbaix diagram of thorium, is there something ThO2 can be oxidized into without the pH being insanely high?
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wg48temp9
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[*] posted on 16-1-2021 at 09:24


Judging by the white colour of ThO2 in a bright light even at a red heat it has low conductivity. Its an insulator.

Confirmed by https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4605090




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itsallgoodjames
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[*] posted on 17-1-2021 at 09:58


Quote: Originally posted by wg48temp9  
Judging by the white colour of ThO2 in a bright light even at a red heat it has low conductivity. Its an insulator.

Confirmed by https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4605090


Oh, I didn't see that. I searched for it's electrical conductivity, but couldn't find anything. Thanks




Nuclear physics is neat. It's a shame it's so regulated...

Now that I think about it, that's probably a good thing. Still annoying though.
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