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Author: Subject: What fire extinguisher is best for a small amature set up?
Kevlar
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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 11:13
What fire extinguisher is best for a small amature set up?


After some thinking about reactions I explicitly do outside or in the concrete garage, I realized some the others I do inside may one day result in a fire. This is just the same as a pan of hot oil on the stove top combusting realy, nothing really reactive like reductions! But like hot oil you can not be using water on certain hot lipid solvents.

Would a good choice be a CO2 extinguisher, they are cheap at about £35 and provide peace of mind and may come in use!
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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 11:35


It depends on the type of fire. CO2 extinguishers are great for conventional oil or solvent fires, but they are not suitable for metal fires (e.g. burning magnesium or sodium). For those, you're better off dumping a bucket of sand on it. So having a CO2 fire extinguisher and a sand bucket on hand should cover any kind of fire you might need to handle.



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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 11:59


I have a sand bucket but want to make the spaces I use more low risk with measures, but I had looked at what would be best like using CO2.

Metal fires you can use a bucket of dry NaCl to put out, or Cat D fire extinguishers which use dry NaCl in powder. Not sure what the gas they use to pressurize them though
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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 12:48


I have a 2.5 kg capacity carbon dioxide extinguisher. Carbon dioxide appeals to me as they are effective against a wide range of fires and in the unlikely event that you need to use it they don't make I huge mess. If you get the correct extinguisher you can also have them refilled, this allows you to have a practice, which isn't a bad idea in my view.
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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 13:04


I'm very health & safety aware, and don't like doing anything I feel is a danger. Not because of myself, I have ADD and have no sense of personal fear. But I do live with people who I care for very much! So, this is a dichotomy of me not being afraid but not wanting to put anybody (esp) those I love in any danger.

I think the £35 CO2 one on Amazon is a 2.5kg capacity, and it seems the most logical option for a broad spectrum of hazards. Coupled with the sand bucket, I think that should be sufficient for amature needs.
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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 14:14


Bucket of sand or a bucket of lime. That's what I used to use because I always worried that the projection of a fire extinguisher would cause flammable solvents to go everywhere. Plus I never had any inhibition to use them unlike a one time use extinguisher. That being said I would probably just get a fire blanket if I were doing it now. Would be even better, less cleanup.



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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 17:38


Off topic perhaps but this came to mind.
However, the unintended release of CO2 from fire-extinguishing systems has caused 72 deaths and 145 injuries, mainly in the marine industry, between 1975 and 2000.

https://www.gov.uk/maib-reports/unintentional-release-of-car...
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[*] posted on 16-2-2024 at 18:36


Thats due to poor H&S Knowledge!

Small spaces & people freezing there skin to a CO2 horn, is well documented. But I will agree it is important to point these risks out.

Safety equipment being dangerous? What the thing that was saving them killed them? YES

Read the information of how to use safety devices, in the environment being used, the device employed and its limitations!

Read up on your H&S risk assesments and reductions. All to true!
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[*] posted on 17-2-2024 at 09:51


At the beginning of my PhD program all the students got to put out a solvent fire with a CO2 extinguisher, under the supervision of the fire department. It was pretty useful practice.



As below, so above.

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[*] posted on 17-2-2024 at 12:18


From an old post and having once been shocked in this way from a hefty old fire extinguisher bought at a flea market ...
"CO2 fire extinguisher discharge hoses are manufactured with a braided continuous wire inside. If the wire in the hose is damaged, the buildup of static electricity can't be dissipated and the operator may experience a shock. This is particularly true if the fire extinguisher is being discharged while being carried up off the ground. That is why NFPA 10 requires that a continuity test be performed on the hose at the time of maintenance to ensure the wire braiding remains capable of dissipating any static buildup. A label is then attached to the hose as an indication that the continuity test has been performed."

"Anyone that is trained to use CO2 should also be trained in the hazard associated with static discharge. Large wheeled units have knocked down operators when the hose bonding wire had been damaged."
http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Have-u-ever-experienced-stati...

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[*] posted on 17-2-2024 at 13:08


I've just found the perfect one, little of an expense you hope to never use. But this beast fights Cat A, B, C, D, E, & F fires.

Firexo All in One Fire Extinguisher (6 Litre / 6 kg) - Multipurpose Extinguisher for All Fires inc. Li-ion Battery Fires! - Safety & Emergency Equipment for Home, Kitchen, Fireplace, Grill, Caravan

Google that beast!
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