Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
Author: Subject: Substitute for oxidizer in primer.
MrFormula
Harmless
*




Posts: 11
Registered: 2-10-2023
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-6-2024 at 07:49
Substitute for oxidizer in primer.


I am trying to make some pull string igniters but I don't have any potassium chlorate. I found a formula by Inventionincarnate on YouTube that is based on the H48 primer. The ignition compound uses 56.4% potassium chlorate, 24.6% antimony trisulfide, 9% sulfur, 0.8% magnesium carbonate, and 10.2% ground glass and the striker uses 33% sulfur, 33% red phosphorus, and 33% ground glass. I was wondering if it would be possible to substitute potassium nitrate for the p chlorate. I would have to recalculate the percentage because of the one less oxygen but that's not a problem. Any insight would be much appreciated as I cannot find anything on the reaction between phosphorus and p chlorate other than the red phosphorus gets converted to white and burns the chlorate because of the friction from the glass but I am not completely certain if this is true.

[Edited on 6-10-24 by MrFormula]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Yorty2040
Harmless
*




Posts: 41
Registered: 1-2-2024
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-6-2024 at 09:54


Potassium chlorate and potassium nitrate have the same number of oxygen atoms per mole. I think you might be thinking of the mass percentage; KNO3 actually has more oxygen by weight. However, it is less sensitive than chlorate, and doesn't have a hypergolic reaction with phosphorus the way chlorates do.

If everything is ground very fine, and kept dry, ground glass might be able to provide enough friction to ignite it, but it would require more force than chlorate. If you're having trouble, you might want to make a spring-loaded striker rather than a pull string one.

The magnesium carbonate is less necessary with nitrates, since there's no chance of forming chloric acid, so you could drop that down to 0.4% and use the remaining 0.4% for iron oxide, which might increase performance.

[Edited on 10-6-2024 by Yorty2040]
View user's profile View All Posts By User
MrFormula
Harmless
*




Posts: 11
Registered: 2-10-2023
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 10-6-2024 at 10:54


Thank you. I don't know why it was so hard to find information on the reaction between chlorate and phosphorus. As for the chlorate and nitrate I mixed up the number of oxygen's in chlorite and chlorate.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Laboratory of Liptakov
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1358
Registered: 2-9-2014
Location: Technion Haifa
Member Is Offline

Mood: old jew

[*] posted on 11-6-2024 at 02:30


If you will use KNO3 instead KClO3, you get ready for a long string of failures. On the field of friction mixtures. Only my opinion, not more....:cool:



Development of primarily - secondary substances CHP (2015) Lithex (2022) Brightelite (2023) Nitrocelite and KC primer (2024)
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Fulmen
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1699
Registered: 24-9-2005
Member Is Offline

Mood: Bored

[*] posted on 11-6-2024 at 04:34


Nitrates are almost certain to fail in this application, there is a reason why they still use chlorates/sulfur for matches.



We're not banging rocks together here. We know how to put a man back together.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Laboratory of Liptakov
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1358
Registered: 2-9-2014
Location: Technion Haifa
Member Is Offline

Mood: old jew

[*] posted on 11-6-2024 at 05:26


With except one nitrate, thus.........Pb(NO3)2 + Pb(H2PO2)2 which is series of interntional designations EPH xy....For example EPH 20 or EPH 26 for loading primer caps.....:cool:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G94NwkUmGsQ&t=755s




Development of primarily - secondary substances CHP (2015) Lithex (2022) Brightelite (2023) Nitrocelite and KC primer (2024)
View user's profile View All Posts By User

  Go To Top