Sciencemadness Discussion Board
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

Printable Version  
 Pages:  1  ..  11    13    15  ..  38
Author: Subject: Bad days in the lab or with glassware?
neptunium
National Hazard
****




Posts: 985
Registered: 12-12-2011
Location: between Uranium and Plutonium
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 27-2-2012 at 06:02


yeah at the emergency room ! after the blood finaly stop gushing..
13 stiches and no nerve damage i got lucky!
it happen so fast i didnt even feel a thing! glass a bad mot....er!




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
+ION
Harmless
*




Posts: 4
Registered: 5-4-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 2-3-2012 at 23:19


Receive flask from Bob.

Have flask out of the box for less than 5 min before I break it.

Yup...




SOOSAD.bmp - 170kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 3-3-2012 at 07:53


That's the worst time for glassware to break . . .I would rather it die valiantly in a destructive distillation than before its even been used.

If you have all the pieces and access to a good glassblower, he/she may be able to fix it for you.




"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
garage chemist
chemical wizard
*****




Posts: 1803
Registered: 16-8-2004
Location: Germany
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 4-3-2012 at 12:48


I got an electric shock from my heating mantle today. Not serious though, just enough to startle me. I didn't even touch any metal parts, just the glass wool with both hands as I was feeling whether it started getting warm. It must be all the moisture in my unheated lab, it condenses inside the glass wool and together with traces of salts from spills and aerosols it becomes partially conductive.



www.versuchschemie.de
Das aktivste deutsche Chemieforum!
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 5-3-2012 at 12:54


Nasty, GC!

Yesterday I was washing glassware. A very cheap Erlenmeyer falls on the floor, and is fine. Phew.
Today, I was washing glassware. A condenser falls on the floor, and breaks. Screw!




"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
neptunium
National Hazard
****




Posts: 985
Registered: 12-12-2011
Location: between Uranium and Plutonium
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 5-3-2012 at 12:59


glasware can be so unpredictable sometimes...trust me !



View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 5-3-2012 at 13:10


I agree! I once had a boiling, concentrated solution of potassium chlorate in a large beaker heating over a Bunsen flame. Two minutes later, a large purple flame is observed as the beaker breaks and the liquid (and glass) is sprayed everywhere!:/



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
plante1999
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1936
Registered: 27-12-2010
Member Is Offline

Mood: Mad as a hatter

[*] posted on 5-3-2012 at 13:38


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  
I agree! I once had a boiling, concentrated solution of potassium chlorate in a large beaker heating over a Bunsen flame. Two minutes later, a large purple flame is observed as the beaker breaks and the liquid (and glass) is sprayed everywhere!:/


It depand on the quality of the glassware , bomex will break only with heating , pyrex classic could withstand boiling water and then be dropped in ice. This is why I buy only pyrex classic beaker/flask and for the test tube pyrex vista.

500 post!!!!





I never asked for this.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
mr.crow
National Hazard
****




Posts: 884
Registered: 9-9-2009
Location: Canada
Member Is Offline

Mood: 0xFF

[*] posted on 11-3-2012 at 12:38


The wind blew over my 1L 24/40 addition funnel and it broke. God fucking dammit!!!



Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 11-3-2012 at 13:44


I'm 13 and my Dad never believes me when I say that the wind blows an item of glassware over and breaks the bloody thing!:)



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
mr.crow
National Hazard
****




Posts: 884
Registered: 9-9-2009
Location: Canada
Member Is Offline

Mood: 0xFF

[*] posted on 11-3-2012 at 13:58


Well I was leaving it out to dry

I hope you don't swear as much as me when something like that happens, haha




Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and caldron bubble
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Endimion17
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1468
Registered: 17-7-2011
Location: shores of a solar sea
Member Is Offline

Mood: speeding through time at the rate of 1 second per second

[*] posted on 11-3-2012 at 15:31


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  
Nasty, GC!

Yesterday I was washing glassware. A very cheap Erlenmeyer falls on the floor, and is fine. Phew.
Today, I was washing glassware. A condenser falls on the floor, and breaks. Screw!


Oh, trust me, it's not fine anymore. Mark it as "potentially failing".

Regarding the swearing, I unleash my fury when shit happens, but otherwise I'm quite calm and dislike swearing. :D




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
barley81
Hazard to Others
***




Posts: 481
Registered: 9-5-2011
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 11-3-2012 at 17:32


The other day, when I was cleaning up my stuff from chromium (VI) residue, I was using sodium metabisulfite. The wet solid fumed so much I couldn't breathe well for 10 minutes afterwards. It made my cough much worse. I hate SO<sub>2</sub>. From now on I'm going to wear a respirator when working with sulfites or just use sodium thiosulfate.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
neptunium
National Hazard
****




Posts: 985
Registered: 12-12-2011
Location: between Uranium and Plutonium
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 11-3-2012 at 17:43


i hate it too man ! its much worse than chlorine ! i take chlorine over SO2 anyday!!



View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
neptunium
National Hazard
****




Posts: 985
Registered: 12-12-2011
Location: between Uranium and Plutonium
Member Is Offline


[*] posted on 12-3-2012 at 09:28


somebody ask me to put a picture of my bad day with glassware and the 13 stiches i got last year....
enjoy!

13 stiches new.JPG - 54kB




View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Endimion17
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1468
Registered: 17-7-2011
Location: shores of a solar sea
Member Is Offline

Mood: speeding through time at the rate of 1 second per second

[*] posted on 12-3-2012 at 11:17


Awesome! Kind of reminds me of this. :cool:



View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 29-3-2012 at 12:59


Nasty!

Today I was dumping a waste lead acetate solution down the toilet and forgot there was a stirbar in it. . .so I attached a magnet to some acrylic rod and went fishing down the lavatorium!:)




"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Lambda-Eyde
National Hazard
****




Posts: 857
Registered: 20-11-2008
Location: Norway
Member Is Offline

Mood: Cleaved

[*] posted on 29-3-2012 at 13:12


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  

Today I was dumping a waste lead acetate solution down the toilet and forgot there was a stirbar in it. . .so I attached a magnet to some acrylic rod and went fishing down the lavatorium!:)


Lead down the toilet? How much? You should rather precipitate it and then dispose of it, or recycle it.

Also, I have forgotten my stirbar at least twice when pouring something into the sink. Unscrewing the trap beneath it and getting it out is pretty nasty work...




This just in: 95,5 % of the world population lives outside the USA
You should really listen to ABBA
Please drop by our IRC channel: #sciencemadness @ irc.efnet.org
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 02:36


I usually do, but it was only a very dilute (probably less than 0.01M) and had a volume of about 30ml. So not much lead was actually present, and, where I live, proper hazardous waste disposal costs an arm and a leg.



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
White Yeti
National Hazard
****




Posts: 816
Registered: 20-7-2011
Location: Asperger's spectrum
Member Is Offline

Mood: delocalized

[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 12:19


Quote: Originally posted by Hexavalent  
where I live, proper hazardous waste disposal costs an arm and a leg.


Are you sure? The least you could have done was to react the lead salt with baking soda to form an insoluble carbonate. I do that whenever I deal with iron salts (after staining multiple things, including my roof :)).

If you're wondering how I stained my roof, I used to have my lab upstairs and I like to keep the window open in the summer. Clumsy as I am, I knocked over a large jar of iron III acetate and it spilled all over the roof. Somehow the jar didn't break, but the solution quickly evaporated and the iron deposited onto my roof. To this day, I'm not sure how to get rid of the stain. I guess you could call that a bad day in the lab.

Just gravity filter out the carbonate and bury it somewhere far, far away. Although lead carbonate is insoluble, it will react with acids and become soluble again over time, so even pouring lead carbonate down the toilet is not a good idea either.

The proper disposal method IIRC is to bubble H2S into a solution with dissolved lead, but considering you didn't even do the bare minimum, I don't think you'll go through that much trouble.




"Ja, Kalzium, das ist alles!" -Otto Loewi
View user's profile View All Posts By User
DJF90
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2266
Registered: 15-12-2007
Location: At the bench
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 1-4-2012 at 15:55


Its very irresponsible to dump ANY heavy metal waste down the drain. Always precipitate it and save it in a polybottle, either as "lead waste" or as "mixed metal waste". The advantage of collecting it separately is that it is re-usable with less hassle than having to separate the elements again. Same with solvent waste, although you can't always recycle this efficiently (e.g. hexane-ethyl acetate waste, boiling points are too close for anything resembling a trivial separation).

I was trying to break up an oil that had solidified in a rbf the other day at work, and ended up putting the spatula right through the wall of the flask, despite not being heavy handed with it. Thankfully my hand was underneath the produced hole, allowing me to catch my valuable product! I was left unscathed thankfully, and my compound was recovered in full.
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 3-4-2012 at 03:22


As aforementioned, only very small amounts of lead ions were actually present, yet from today forwards I shall do as you say and collect all hazardous waste. But, alas, what should I do with it when it's full?



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
woelen
Super Administrator
*********




Posts: 7958
Registered: 20-8-2005
Location: Netherlands
Member Is Offline

Mood: interested

[*] posted on 3-4-2012 at 06:19


I collect all hazardous metal waste in a single bottle. This bottle contains solutions of lead, cadmium, nickel, silver, mercury, tellurium and quite a few others. When it is full, I bring it to a municipal waste processing facility and I tell that it is photography darkroom waste. The bottle is labeled with the text "heavy metal waste".

In this way, the heavy metals do not go down the drain and I also do not bury any precipitate (which to my opinion is even worse than pouring it down the drain).

Many other metals salts I simply dispose of down the drain, e.g. iron, titanium, manganese, magnesium, calcium, chromium(III). Metals like zinc, copper, nickel, cobalt are borderline. If I have a gram or so of metal waste, then I put it in the bottle, if it is minor (only 100 mg or so, or a few ml of dilute solution in a test tube), then it goes down the drain with a lot of water.

--------------------------------------------------------------

Volatile organics I simply dispose of by letting them evaporate outside on a paper tissue and when the tissue is dry, I put it in the normal household waste. Having a few ml of e.g. DCM, acetone, chloroform or some other organic evaporate outside does no harm at all.




The art of wondering makes life worth living...
Want to wonder? Look at https://woelen.homescience.net
View user's profile Visit user's homepage View All Posts By User
DJF90
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 2266
Registered: 15-12-2007
Location: At the bench
Member Is Offline

Mood: No Mood

[*] posted on 7-4-2012 at 11:02
FUCK!


Shoulda drained the water out of this before winter. Expensive mistake...

IMAG0206.jpg - 122kB
View user's profile View All Posts By User
Hexavalent
International Hazard
*****




Posts: 1564
Registered: 29-12-2011
Location: Wales, UK
Member Is Offline

Mood: Pericyclic

[*] posted on 7-4-2012 at 11:45


Is that from your rotovap? I feel sorry for you:)



"Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." Winston Churchill
View user's profile View All Posts By User
 Pages:  1  ..  11    13    15  ..  38

  Go To Top