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Author: Subject: Valorizing the Glycerol from Biodiesel Production
UnintentionalChaos
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[*] posted on 23-6-2008 at 18:00


Glycerol, in a non-oxidizing, hot environment such as use as engine grease would lead to dehydration forming awful smelling, toxic acrolein which would polymerize and gunk up the engine. Not only that but its hygroscopic and would promote corossion.

It probably would not be good for soil dwelling organisms....I've been wondering if you can chlorinate only one of the alchohol groups and use it to modify cellulose producing a thickening agent similar to hydroxyethyl cellulose.




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[*] posted on 26-7-2008 at 13:01


Glycerol from biodiesel must compete with synthetic glycerol.
And derivatives such as acrolein, allyl alcohol, etc., must compete with petrochemicals.

The most interesting use of waste glycerol that I've run into is reacting it with oxygen & superheated steam to create synthesis gas (CO + H2) for manufacture of methanol, F-T liquid fuels & basic petrochemicals such as butyraldehydes from propylene (the 'oxo' process). In this way it replaces fossil fuels so that they can be used for more critical applications.

[Edited on 26-7-2008 by Ritter]




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[*] posted on 27-7-2008 at 05:06


Quote:
Originally posted by Ritter
...
The most interesting use of waste glycerol that I've run into is reacting it with oxygen & superheated steam to create synthesis gas (CO + H2) ...


That syngas is going to have a lot of CO2 in it, until scrubbed out, unlike syngas from coal or hydrocarbons.

(COH2)3H2 ==> 3 CO + 4 H2 if you could make it happen

(COH2)3H2 + xO2 => 2x CO2 + 3-2x CO + 4H2 or combinations with some water

(COH2)3H2 + xH2O => x CO2 + 3-x CO + 4+x H2
&ct

Those lower yields of CO, combined with the relatively low energy content of glycerol, will make for fairly expensive syngas.
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[*] posted on 27-7-2008 at 06:03


Quote:
Originally posted by not_important
Quote:
Originally posted by Ritter
...
The most interesting use of waste glycerol that I've run into is reacting it with oxygen & superheated steam to create synthesis gas (CO + H2) ...


That syngas is going to have a lot of CO2 in it, until scrubbed out, unlike syngas from coal or hydrocarbons.

(COH2)3H2 ==> 3 CO + 4 H2 if you could make it happen

(COH2)3H2 + xO2 => 2x CO2 + 3-2x CO + 4H2 or combinations with some water

(COH2)3H2 + xH2O => x CO2 + 3-x CO + 4+x H2
&ct

Those lower yields of CO, combined with the relatively low energy content of glycerol, will make for fairly expensive syngas.


As I pointed out in another thread, there are developing technologies for reducing CO2 to either methanol or F-T liquid fuels.




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[*] posted on 22-8-2008 at 00:10


Future of Glycerol: New Usages for a Versatile Raw Material (RSC Green Chemistry Series)
by Mario Pagliaro, Michele Rossi

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41rgHZ46MDL.jpg

This book aims to inform chemistry professionals, including managers and technologists, on the large potential of glycerol as versatile biofeedstock for the production of a variety of chemicals, polymers and fuels. Whilst filling a gap in the current literature, this nicely illustrated book is written in a clear, concise style and presents the numerous uses of glycerol as a new raw material which are starting to have an impact on industry worldwide. Elucidation of the principles governing the new chemistry of glycerol goes along with updated industrial information that is generally difficult to retrieve.

Through its 10 chapters, the monograph tells the story of a chemical success that of converting glycerol into value added products and highlights the principles that made it possible. Whether as solvent, antifreeze, detergent, monomer for textiles or drug, new catalytic conversions of glycerol have been discovered that are finding application for the synthesis of products whose use range from everyday's life to the fine chemical industry.

Readers are also shown how a number of practical limitations posed by glycerol chemistry, such as the low selectivity encountered employing traditional stoichiometric and older catalytic conversions, were actually solved based on the understanding of the fundamental chemistry of glycerol and by application of catalysis science and technology.

Readers also find a thorough discussion on the sustainability issues of bioglycerol production covering societal, environmental and economic dimensions to reflect the needs of politicians and citizens of today who require cross border research. By explaining the advantages and problems as well as offering solutions the book aids understanding as to whether biodiesel and glycerol refineries are convenient and economically sound.

Link posted in the : The New Book Thread (Organic Chemistry)

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