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Author: Subject: Iron oxide + conc. acetic acid in one go
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[*] posted on 15-1-2017 at 04:58
Iron oxide + conc. acetic acid in one go


the interwebs suggested using vinegar to clean rusty metal and found a big chunk of iron that was badly rusted so decided to clean it up using vinegar, soaking the whole thing in vinegar and scrubbing the surface clean every now and then, using 5% household vinegar

some iron acetate formed would make sense as iron hydroxides and carbonates would be likely to react, iron oxide itself being trickier to get to react, at least Fe2O3 - however after weeks of reacting the iron with vinegar the metal piece came out with a nice dark finish to it, but somewhat clean surface, the leftovers i let dry out at room temperature and decided to turn all the way into Fe2O3, supposing there would be a lot of mixed iron hydroxides and carbonates left

as the whole thing heated up, it became quite obvious that the dry stuff was producing some very concentrated fumes of acetic acid, quite surprised. but the iron oxide seems somewhat pure, nicely red, and indeed considering overall reaction time this process is a lot easier than turning electrolysis formed magnetite into red iron oxide by heating and air oxidation this has some serious potential for whom wishes not to buy, but to produce

so far no clue what concentration of acetic acid, but probably well above 60%

it could seem however that magnetite is the first iron oxide produced, but as its nanoparticles, or lets at least call it quite fine particles it would very quickly react with air

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258583710_Size-Cont...

iron (II) acetate appears to be soluble in water, and forming tetrahydrate, the hydrate could likely make sure that +95% acetic acid would be difficult to get from simply decomposing the iron acetate, i would imagine a lot of acetic acid going lost if one were to react metallic iron with acetic acid as it requires temperature and probably concentrated acetic acid, which conflicts the whole process a bit, however using iron hydroxides and carbonates could make for a way to somewhat easily produce concentrated acetic acid




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[*] posted on 15-1-2017 at 06:31


I guess wet iron acetate decomposes via basic iron acetate to acetic acid and iron oxide

Try to condense and titrate it!

[Edited on 15-1-2017 by Tsjerk]
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[*] posted on 15-1-2017 at 08:23


currently trying to extract remaining acetate with water, not sure if i have enough to get any actual acetic acid out of though



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[*] posted on 17-1-2017 at 06:30


Try a heated mix of dilute H2O2 add to vinegar with a dose of sea salt.

I suspect you be surprised!
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[*] posted on 21-1-2017 at 03:01


supposing thats for cleaning iron?

after very carefully boiling off water at around 70*C for some days i got almost 5 grammes of sticky solid that has a melting point of around 105*C, attempting to collect vapours from this solid, at 105*C it also emitted some acetic acid fumes




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[*] posted on 21-1-2017 at 04:02


Iron oxide(III) (hematite) will not react with Nitric acid or Sulfuric acid or even HCl.

How ACOH can dissolve it?

I was unsuccessful in making iron nitrate from iron oxide
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=17161

also there is iron acetate topic
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/viewthread.php?tid=6214
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