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Author: Subject: What is the point of amateur chemistry?
Texium (zts16)
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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 11:15




pancakes house.jpg - 68kB




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Magpie
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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 12:13


I love Peter Stormare. He's a Swede you know, hence his sometimes crude English. Notice he doesn't bother with his seat belt. That's for wimps.

[Edited on 13-6-2018 by Magpie]




The single most important condition for a successful synthesis is good mixing - Nicodem
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MrHomeScientist
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[*] posted on 13-6-2018 at 12:22


You know, it's "burgers house" now.
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coppercone
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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 14:59


Really if you work hard you can do unique research in most fields in your house or document stuff that's poorly documented or horded internally by companies or explain stuff that's explained poorly for use of others. Tons of companies are just too paranoid to patent and rather keep internal trade secrets on manufacturing steps or designs etc. If you work on replicating what someone else is doing privately you might discover hidden shit.

It's alot of work, and some shit is just out of reach due to cost and regulation (i.e. studying neutron flux effect on custom alloys is not gonna happen at home unless your Dr. Venture or do some complete mad cunt shit). I can kind of see some nuclear physicsts getting pissed that someone talented is making a reactor at home rather then tackling serious problems (but its kind of short sighted on the professor) that there is a lack of minds in the field for.

Sometimes I get the feeling that the people you describe are kind of like ants where they are trying to force people into putting their effort into research projects described as being collectively good by society. I also get the feeling that they don't like the struggle that comes with doing stuff yourself and not being part of a collective... but that's why you can pay people privately to make stuff like complicated glassware or do custom synthesis to save you time.

Also if you work for a company and you are passionate you will find that its often worth doing it for yourself properly.. rather then designing around profit. I bet you will usually find problems in most places with how things are built and how they can be better.

A problem I ran into though is how many fucking crafts you need to know to do something, like you need to study a buncha HVAC bullshit, corrosion bullshit, electrical power system shit, metrology shit, just to build or even test/maintain a fume hood, whereas in a university you can hyperfocus on one thing and have some kind of established maintenance people take your mind off of doing a buncha maintenance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39qW-Q42QlU :cool:


[Edited on 15-6-2018 by coppercone]
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roXefeller
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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 18:19



Quote:

Really if you work hard you can do unique research in most fields in your house or document stuff that's poorly documented or horded internally by companies or explain stuff that's explained poorly for use of others. Tons of companies are just too paranoid to patent and rather keep internal trade secrets on manufacturing steps or designs etc. If you work on replicating what someone else is doing privately you might discover hidden shit.


It's offensive to generically brand industrial research as hoarding or paranoia. The cost to learn is expensive for anything that isn't already common knowledge. If a company gives away costly research without recovering some or all of the cost they will quickly become an ex-entity. Industrial or national espionage is an existential threat. The USA damaged Britain's position in the textile market during the industrial revolution through espionage. Other nations do it to the USA and others. In the news we hear about violations of intellectual property by the Chinese against many. The outcome might be beneficial for many sometimes but removes the incentive at other times.

The patent system, as I see it in America at least, is basically a giveaway to thieves. The only exception is for those who enforce protection of their own through the courts. But even then it isn't a sure thing to successfully defend a claim.
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Texium (zts16)
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[*] posted on 15-6-2018 at 20:36


coppercone: if you can write your future posts to contain fewer instances of "shit," that would be much appreciated.



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hissingnoise
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[*] posted on 29-6-2018 at 03:27


C'mon Tex, that word is so ubiquitous now, it's lost its cachet...


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