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Author: Subject: Particles produce in chemical reactions
DeAdFX
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[*] posted on 29-12-2007 at 15:17
Particles produce in chemical reactions


I was reading on skylighters blog about the different ways Metal powders (specifically Al and Mg) can be produced. For example spherical is produced by making small droplets of molten aluminum.

Another unrelated industrial process is the Glycine Nitrate Process(GNP) process which involves dissolving glycine and metal nitrate inside of water and heating until ignition. The articles that mentioned the process only said it was a different way of producing nanometer sized metal oxides for ceramics and what not.

This got me thinking... What kind of particles are produced in various chemical reactions(combustion, single/double displacement, electroplating and so on)? I don't have a microscope so I can't investigate any further.

I know that if you recrystalize a solution of ionic compounds you can get some pretty nice looking crystals. For example if you recrystalize potassium nitrate i believe you can get needle like crystals. So perhaps in GNP if you used barium nitrate as your metal nitrate would the barium oxide particles end up being nanometer sized cubes? (its crystal structure is cubic according to wiki).
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[*] posted on 29-12-2007 at 22:35


Not sure if you'd get BaO, BaCO3 - decomposes ~1300 C or so, or a mix that might include BaO2. Even though the ignition might go above 1300, there'd be a lot of CO2 around as the products cool and barium oxide containing mixed oxides tend to grab CO2 easily. Wouldn't want to hazard the actual structure.

hmmm this has a few photos of the products from some mixtures

http://www.netl.doe.gov/publications/proceedings/02/material...
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chemrox
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[*] posted on 30-12-2007 at 01:14


H2 permeable membranes. Seems like something more useful for fuel syntheses. I need an ethanol permeable membrane. Maybe U doped mica or some synthetic zeolites ..



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[*] posted on 30-12-2007 at 03:08


Quote:
Originally posted by chemrox
... I need an ethanol permeable membrane. Maybe U doped mica or some synthetic zeolites ..


Generally membranes for alcohol separation are organic with controlled hydrophobic characteristics. Zeolites have been used, but they appear to be a bugger to make and use.

http://aiche.confex.com/aiche/2006/techprogram/P57080.HTM

http://www.mtrinc.com/publications/PER01%20MTR%20BioSep%20Pr...

http://www.ajevonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/37/4/297

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/pr/2007/070626.htm
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