Camphor

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Camphor
Names
IUPAC name
1,7,7-Trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one
Other names
2-Bornanone
Bornan-2-one
2-Camphanone
Formosa
Properties
C10H16O
Molar mass 152.237 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Fragrant and penetrating
Density 0.992 g/cm3
Melting point 175–177 °C (347–351 °F; 448–450 K)
Boiling point 209 °C (408 °F; 482 K)
0.12 g/100 ml
Solubility Soluble in benzene, carbon disulfide, chloroform, diethyl ether, ethanol
Vapor pressure 4 mmHg (at 70 °C)
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich (racemic)
Flash point 54 °C (129 °F; 327 K)
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
1310 mg/kg (oral, mouse)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Borneol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Camphor is an organic compound, a terpenoid, a waxy, flammable, transparent solid with a strong aroma.

The molecule has two possible enantiomers as shown in the structural diagrams. The structure on the left is the naturally occurring (R)-form, while its mirror image shown on the right is the (S)-form.

Properties

Chemical

Camphor can be oxidized with concentrated nitric acid.

Physical

Camphor is a waxy, transparent solid with a strong aroma. It is almost insoluble in water.

Availability

Camphor can be bought from lab suppliers.

Preparation

Camphor is best bought than made.

Projects

  • Make borneol

Handling

Safety

May be irritant.

Storage

In closed bottles.

Disposal

No special disposal is required.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads