Dinitrogen trioxide

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Dinitrogen trioxide
Names
IUPAC name
Dinitrogen trioxide
Preferred IUPAC name
Dinitrogen trioxide
Other names
N-oxonitramide
Nitrogen sesquioxide
Nitrous anhydride
Properties
N2O3
Molar mass 76.01 g/mol
Appearance Deep blue gas
Odor Stinging, unpleasant
Density 1.447 g/cm3 (liquid)
1.783 g/cm3 (gas)
Melting point −100.7 °C (−149.3 °F; 172.5 K)
Boiling point 3.5 °C (38.3 °F; 276.6 K) (dissociates)
Reacts
Solubility Reacts with alcohols
Soluble in CCl4, chloroform, diethyl ether, sulfuryl chloride, liq. xenon
Thermochemistry
314.63 J·K-1·mol-1
91.20 kJ/mol
Hazards
Safety data sheet None
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Related compounds
Nitrous oxide
Nitric oxide
Nitrogen dioxide
Dinitrogen tetroxide
Dinitrogen pentoxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Dinitrogen trioxide is a chemical compound with the chemical formula N2O3.

Properties

Chemical

It is the anhydride of the unstable nitrous acid (HNO2), and produces it when mixed into water.

N2O3 + 2 H2O → 2 HNO2

If the nitrous acid is not then used up quickly, it decomposes into nitric oxide and nitric acid. Nitrite salts are sometimes produced by adding N2O3 to alkaline solutions:

N2O3 + 2 NaOH → 2 NaNO2 + H2O

Physical

Dinitrogen trioxide is a blue gas, with a strong odor.

Availability

This compound is not sold and has to be made in situ.

Preparation

Can be prepared by mixing equal parts of nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide and cooling the mixture below -21 °C

NO + NO2 ⇌ N2O3

Both gasses can be obtained by dissolving copper in conc. nitric acid.

Dinitrogen trioxide is only isolable at low temperatures, i.e. in the liquid and solid phases. At higher temperatures the equilibrium favors the constituent gases, with Kdiss = 193 kPa (25 °C).

Projects

  • Make nitrites

Handling

Safety

Dinitrogen trioxide is toxic and corrosive.

Storage

Can only be kept at very low temperatures, but not for long.

Disposal

Can be neutralized by bubbling it in alkaline water.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads