Fructose

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Fructose
Fructose box and sample.jpg
Store-grade fructose
Names
IUPAC name
1,3,4,5,6-Pentahydroxy-2-hexanone
Systematic IUPAC name
1,3,4,5,6-Pentahydroxy-2-hexanone
Other names
Fruit sugar
levulose
D-fructofuranose
D-fructose
D-arabino-hexulose
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
C6H12O6
Density 1.694 g/cm3
Melting point 103 °C (217 °F; 376 K)
Boiling point Decomposes
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
15000 mg/kg (intravenous, rabbit)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Glucose
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Fructose, also known as fruit sugar, is a simple ketonic monosaccharide found in many plants and fruits, where it is generally bonded to glucose to form the disaccharide sucrose.

Properties

Chemical

Fructose may be anaerobically fermented by yeast or bacteria to ethanol, releasing carbon dioxide.

When mixed with an oxidizer, such as potassium nitrate, it will burn vigorously.

Physical

Fructose is a white or transparent crystalline solid, soluble in water.

Availability

Fructose is sold in most food stores, supermarkets or hypermarkets. Prices depend on the brand.

Preparation

Fructose can be prepared through the hydrolysis of table sugar (sucrose) in warm water, in the presence of potassium bitartrate or citric acid. The resulting fructose is recrystallized from the mixture.

Projects

Handling

Safety

Fructose has extremely low toxicity, but it's best to avoid consuming lab-grade reagent.

Storage

In any containers and kept in dry places, away from mold.

Disposal

Fructose can be safely burned, dumped in ground or poured down the drain.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads