Magnesium oxide

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Magnesium oxide
Names
IUPAC name
Magnesium oxide
Other names
Magnesia
Magnesia alba
Oxomagnesium
Periclase
Properties
MgO
Molar mass 40.304 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density 3.6 g/cm3
Melting point 2,825 °C (5,117 °F; 3,098 K)
Boiling point 3,600 °C (6,510 °F; 3,870 K)
Insoluble, some reacts to form Mg(OH)2
Solubility Reacts with acids, ketones
Insoluble in alcohols, esters, ethers, halocarbons, hydrocarbons
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Thermochemistry
26.95 ± 0.15 J·mol−1·K−1
−601.6 ± 0.3 kJ/mol
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Flash point Non-flammable
Related compounds
Related compounds
Beryllium oxide
Calcium oxide
Strontium oxide
Barium oxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Magnesium oxide (MgO) or magnesia, is a white hygroscopic solid compound, an oxide of magnesium. It occurs naturally as the mineral periclase.

Properties

Chemical

Magnesium oxide reacts with water to form magnesium hydroxide, though the reaction is very slow at room temperature, a consequence of its low solubility in water. It will however react vigorously with acids, giving magnesium salts.

MgO + 2 HX → + MgX2 + H2O

Magnesium oxide will not react with bases.

Physical

Magnesium oxide is a white solid, insoluble in water.

Availability

Magnesium oxide can be bought from pharmacies, as antiacid, though most often tends to be impure.

Higher purity magnesium oxide can be bought online or from chemical suppliers

Preparation

Can be prepared by burning magnesium metal in air or dissolving it in water, then calcinate the resulting magnesium hydroxide.

Another route involves calcinating magnesium carbonate/hydroxide at high temperatures

Projects

  • Make magnesium salts
  • Magnesia crucible
  • Electrical insulator in tubular heating elements

Handling

Safety

Magnesium oxide has low toxicity, though it may be irritant to touch. Inhalation of magnesium oxide fumes may cause metal fume fever.

Storage

In closed bottles, away from acids and halogens.

Disposal

No special disposal is required. Discard it as you wish.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads