Octane

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Octane
Names
IUPAC name
n-octane
Systematic IUPAC name
Octane
Identifiers
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
C8H18
Molar mass 114.23 g/mol
Density 0.703 g/cm3
Melting point −57.1 to −56.6 °C; −70.9 to −69.8 °F; 216.0 to 216.6 K
Boiling point 125.1 to 126.1 °C; 257.1 to 258.9 °F; 398.2 to 399.2 K
0.007 mg/l (at 20 °C)
Vapor pressure 1.47 kPa (at 20.0 °C)
Viscosity 542 μPa s (at 20 °C)
Hazards
Safety data sheet ScienceLab
Related compounds
Related compounds
Heptane
Nonane
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Octane or n-octane is an aliphatic straight-chain hydrocarbon with the chemical formula C8H18. While the n form has few uses, one of its isomers, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane is an important component of gasoline and the standard 100 point on the octane rating scale.

Properties

Chemical

Octane will burn in air in the presence of an ignition source.

Physical

Octane is a colorless liquid, with a petroleum odor, insoluble in water, but miscible with other organic solvents.

Availability

Octane can be extracted from various petroleum solvents, such as Stoddard solvent (which contains a mixture of aliphatic and alicyclic C7 to C12 hydrocarbons), via fractional distillation, though you need a large amount of solvent to obtain any useful amount of n-octane.

Lastly, octane can be purchased from chemical suppliers.

Preparation

n-Octane can be prepared from the decarboxylation of the pelargonic (nonanoic) acid salts, which can be isolated from Pelargonium oil.

Projects

  • Fuel
  • Organic extractions

Handling

Safety

Octane vapors are irritant and because it's flammable, it is considered a fire hazard.

Storage

In closed bottles, away from any heat source.

Disposal

Octane can be safely burned.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads

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