Aminoguanidinium nitrate

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Aminoguanidinium nitrate
Names
IUPAC name
2-Aminoguanidinium nitrate
Other names
2-Aminoguanidine nitrate
α-Aminoguanidine nitrate
Aminoguanidine nitrate
Hydrazinecarboximidamide nitrate
Monoaminoguanidine nitrate
Monoaminoguanidinium nitrate
Properties
CH7N5O3
Molar mass 137.10 g/mol
Appearance White solid
Odor Odorless
Density 1.566 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 145–147 °C (293–297 °F; 418–420 K)
5 g/100 ml (9 °C)
16 g/100 ml (20 °C)
81.2 g/100 ml (98 °C)[2][3]
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Related compounds
Related compounds
Aminoguanidine
Aminoguanidinium bicarbonate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Aminoguanidinium nitrate (incorrectly but often written aminoguanidine nitrate) is an organic chemical compound used as energetic material, especially in hobby experiments.

Properties

Chemical

Aminoguanidinium nitrate decomposes if heated, sometimes with flame. It has been mentioned in the literature that on evaporation of an aqueous solution with a steam bath the salt violently exploded.[4]

Physical

Aminoguanidinium nitrate is a white solid.

Explosive

Aminoguanidinium nitrate can explode under heat and mechanical stress.

Availability

It is sold by chem suppliers.

Preparation

Aminoguanidinium nitrate can be easily prepared by reacting aminoguanidinium bicarbonate with nitric acid.[5]

Can also be made by reducing nitroguanidine with Zn powder in acid, followed by reaction with nitric acid..

Projects

  • Energetic materials

Handling

Safety

Should be handled with care.

Storage

In closed bottles.

Disposal

Controlled incineration should suffice.

References

  1. Akella, Annapoorna; Keszler, Douglas A.; Acta Crystallographica, Section C: Crystal Structure Communications; vol. 50; (1994); p. 1974 - 1976
  2. Barlot; Marsaule; Memorial des Poudres; vol. 35; (1953); p. 349,352,354
  3. Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie; vol. 270; (1892); p. 44; Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie; vol. 271; (1892); p. 129
  4. Peter Urben, Bretherick's Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards: An indexed guide to published data, 5th edition 2016, ISBN 9781483294087, page 205, entry 496. preview of the book.
    In the 6th edition: page 198, entry 512.
    In the 7th edition: page 227, entry 509.
  5. Hegarty,A.F. et al.; Journal of the Chemical Society, Perkin Transactions 2: Physical Organic Chemistry (1972-1999); (1973); p. 2054 - 2060

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