2-Octanone

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2-Octanone
Names
IUPAC name
2-octanone
Other names
Methyl hexyl ketone
Properties
C8H16O
Appearance Colorless liquid
Density 0.815-0.817 g/cm3
Melting point −16 °C (3 °F; 257 K)
Boiling point 173–175 °C (343–347 °F; 446–448 K)
Vapor pressure 1.35 mm Hg at 25 °C
Hazards
Flash point 62.78
Related compounds
Related compounds
3-Octanone
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

2-Octanone is an eight carbon ketone that is usually made from the oxidation of 2-octanol. It is a mobile, oily liquid with a pungent odor that can be unpleasant at high concentrations.

Properties

Chemical

2-Octanone will burn in air to release carbon dioxide and water vapor.

Physical

2-Octanone is a clear, colorless liquid. It is oily and barely soluble in water (0.899 g/L at 20 °C), although it will form emulsions. It is however soluble in alcohols and ether It has a strong odor which is reminiscent of fruity candy and blue (green) cheese, sometimes described as unripe apple.[1]

Availability

2-Octanone is only available from the major chemical suppliers and some specialty aroma compound companies.

Preparation

The simplest method of preparing 2-octanol is by the Jones oxidation of 2-octanol.
(explanation of procedure will be posted here soon -zts16)

Another method involves distilling sodium ricinoleate, obtained from castor oil, with sodium hydroxide.[2]

Projects

Handling

Safety

2-Octanone is not hazardous to handle, although it has a very strong odor that can be unpleasant to have on the skin.

Storage

There are no special storage precautions.

Disposal

Spills of 2-octanone and glassware that has been used with it can be cleaned up easily using isopropanol, acetone, or a mixture of both. Afterwards it can be successfully mopped up with water.

References

http://www.thegoodscentscompany.com/data/rw1001751.html

  1. http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/2-octanone
  2. Lewis, R.J. Sr.; Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary 14th Edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New York, NY 2001., p. 737

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