Silver nitrite

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Silver nitrite
Names
IUPAC name
Silver nitrite
Properties
AgNO2
Molar mass 153.87 g/mol
Appearance White to yellowish crystals
Odor Odorless
Density 4.453 g/cm3 (25 °C)
Melting point 140 °C (284 °F; 413 K)
Boiling point Decomposes
0.155 g/100 ml (0 °C)
0.275 g/100 ml (15 °C)
1.363 g/100 ml (60 °C)
Solubility Insoluble in ethanol, hydrocarbons
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Related compounds
Related compounds
Silver nitrate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Silver nitrite is an inorganic compound with the formula AgNO2.

Properties

Chemical

Silver nitrite will react with haloalkanes to give nitro compounds.

Physical

Silver nitrite is a white-yellow solid, slightly soluble in water.

Availability

Silver nitrite can be bought from lab suppliers and online.

Preparation

Silver nitrite is produced from the reaction between silver nitrate and an alkali nitrite, such as sodium nitrite. Silver nitrite is much less soluble in water than silver nitrate, and a solution of silver nitrate will readily precipitate silver nitrite upon addition of sodium nitrite:

AgNO3 + NaNO2 → NaNO3 + AgNO2

Alternatively, it can be produced by the reaction between silver sulfate and barium nitrite.

Ag2SO4 + Ba(NO2)2 → 2 AgNO2 + BaSO4

Projects

  • Preparation of aniline compounds
  • Preparation of nitro compounds

Handling

Safety

Silver nitrite can stain the skin as well as most objects and is toxic if swallowed. Protection gloves should be worn when handling the compound.

Storage

In closed amber or opaque plastic bottles, away from sunlight and reducing agents.

Disposal

Since silver is expensive, it's best to recycle it.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads