Sodium orotate

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Sodium orotate
Names
IUPAC name
Sodium 2,4-dihydroxypyrimidine-6-carboxylate
Other names
Sodium uracil-6-carboxylate
Identifiers
154-85-8
Jmol-3D images Image
Properties
NaC5H3N2O4
Molar mass 178.085 g/mol
Appearance White powder
Odor Odorless
Boiling point Decomposes
0.294 g/100 ml (25 °C)
Solubility Insoluble in methanol, ethanol
Vapor pressure ~0 mmHg
Hazards
Safety data sheet Sigma-Aldrich
Related compounds
Related compounds
Orotic acid
Sodium uranyl zinc acetate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Sodium orotate, NaC5H3N2O4, is the sodium salt of orotic acid, a metabolic intermediate and chelating agent for certain cations. It is of particular interest as a salt of sodium with a very low solubility in water.

Properties

Chemical

Sodium orotate decomposes at high temperatures.

Physical

Sodium orotate is a white solid, poorly soluble in water.

Availability

Sodium orolate is sold by chemical suppliers.

Preparation

While sodium orotate is not generally available itself OTC, other salts of orotic acid are available as nutritional supplements, particularly magnesium orotate. With the exception of the equally insoluble potassium orotate, these salts will react with sodium chloride in water to precipitate sodium orotate.

Alternatively, it can be prepared by mixing hot aq. solutions of orotic acid and sodium carbonate.

Handling

Safety

Sodium orotate is generally inert and not expected to pose health or environmental hazards in reasonable quantities.

Storage

In closed plastic or glass bottles.

Disposal

Due to its low solubility and high sodium content mean that it should not flow down a drain or be allowed to mix with soil, as excess sodium is harmful to plants. However, unless one disposes of very large amounts of this compound, this isn't always a problem.

References

Relevant Sciencemadness threads